Research which has so far been done it is becoming

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research which has so far been done, it is becoming quite obvious that development planning which takes account of environmental factors need not be more costly than development planning which ignores the environment. Let us not be deterred by the larger number of inputs reqUired for environmental planning. The fact is that even in the short-run the outputs from this type of planning can be much more comprehensive, useful and economic than from ad hoc decision-making. 144. Jamaica attaches the greatest i1J.1portance to the activities being pursued under United Nations auspices regarding the law of the sea, the utilization of the resources of the sea, and the preservation of the sea as a clean, 133. In 1970 the over-all development progress of the structures that would allow them to implement adequate developing countries achieved a growth rate of 5 per cent. development policies. We are thus faced with the double That was also the average growth rate of the 1960s-a rate task of trail'Jng manpower while at the same time establish- not regarded as satisfactory by the countries most con· ing institutions and carrying out development plans. cerned. The developing countries are conscious of their own problems: rapid population growth; rampant unemploy- ment; haphazard urbanization; inadequate housing; undiversified and meagre diets; insufficient facilities for health and education. They eau and are tackling those problems by their own efforts and with outside help when it is available. But they suffer greatly from other problems not of their making and outside their control. b4. This globe is but a small world. Economic impulses are transmitted from one country to another almost immediately. Inflation in one country is quickly exported to another, and the more powerful the inflation-producing country, the more widespread the havoc. It is obvious that the main responsibility for finding solutions rests with those that possess the greatest economic strength. An orderly economic expansion of the rich countries is vital not only for their own benefit but also for the progress of the developing countries, which depend on the delicate links of international trade and fmance for the wherewithal to meet their own development ambitions. 135. Bearing that in mind, Jamaica believes that, should the enlargement of the Europe~"l Economic Community come about, due consideration will be given in the formulation of its future plans and policies to the needs of the developing countries-and, in particular, th()se whose economies will be seriously affected by the merger. 12 General Assembly - Twenty-sixth Session ;- Plenary Meetings 137. We look forward with high expectation to the forthcoming meeting of minist(lrS from the developing countries to be held in Lima, Peru, and to a successful conclusion of the work of the third session of the United Nations Conference on Trade" and Development, which will be convened in Santiago, Chile, in 1972. In the midst of all these preparations, it is hoped that there will be an early resumption of confident trading on the

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