Petite bourgeoisie marx says is class of small scale

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Petite bourgeoisie: Marx says is class of small-scale capitalists who own a means ofproduction but employ only a few workers or none at all, forcing them to do physical workthemselves Critique of MarxIndustrial societies didn’t polarize into 2 opposed classes engaged in bitter conflictlike he saidHe didn’t expect investment in technology to also make it possible for workers toearn higher wages and toil fewer hours under less oppressive conditions— onlythought would happen to capitalistsHe predicted communism would take root where industry was highly developed—itdidn’t; took place in semi-industrialized countries (Russia, China) oWeberDidn’t think communism would create classlessnessDidn’t think ownership vs. non-ownership of property determined class positionSaid class position determined by person’s “market situation,” including possession ofgoods, opportunities for income, level of education, and degree of technical skill
Says 4 main classes1.Large property owners2.Small property owners3.Propertyless but relatively highly educated and well-paid employees4.Propertyless manual workers3 main bases of stratificationStatus groupStatus groups: differ from one another in terms of the prestige or social honorthey enjoy and also in terms of their style of lifeRacial/ethnic stratification: frequently bsed on statusClass, party, and status frequently coincide—high class positions have highstatus and lots of powerExceptions: mobster, drug king-pen, owner of porn companyPower/partyParties: Weber says are organizations that seek to impose their will on othersFocused more on this than economic resourcesPower: Weber says is ability of an actor to realize its will in a social relationwhen that will is resisted by othersClass/economic positionSays are multiple class divisionsLike Weber, Erik Olin Wright says are 12 classes o 3 classes of owners ofproduction: bourgeoisie, small employers, petty bourgeoisieo3 classes of managers: expert managers, semi-credentialed managers, and uncredentialedmanagerso3 classes of supervisors: expert supervisors, semi-credentialed supervisors, and uncredentialedsupervisorso3 classes of workers: expert non-managers, semi-credentialed workers, and the proletariansoFunctionalismFunctionalist theory of stratification: argues that (1) some jobs more important than others,(2) people must make sacrifices to train for important jobs, (3) inequality is required tomotivate people to undergo these sacrificesProposed by Kingsley Davis and Wilbert MooreSocial stratification is necessary (“functional”) because prospect of high rewards motivatespeople to undergo sacrifices needed to get a higher education Problems with theoryIgnores pool of talent undiscovered because of inequalityFails to examine how advantages are passed from generation to generationC. Wright Mills’ The Power Elite o Sees organizations as means ofpower in ‘modern’ society

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