See Sentencing Project Director Marc Mauer discuss reducing prison populations

See sentencing project director marc mauer discuss

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See Sentencing Project Director, Marc Mauer, discuss reducing prison populations in Texas in the face of budget constraints at: GuUNWEjc&feature=player_detailpage, or scan this code with the QR app on your smartphone or digital device to watch the video. The transcript of the interview can be read here: texas-legislature/82nd-legislative-session/ marc-mauer-the-tt-interview/ EXHIBIT 1–4 Careers in Corrections Academic teacher Activity therapy administrator Business manager Case manager Chaplain Chemical dependency manager Children’s services counselor Classification officer Clinical social worker Correctional officer Dietary officer Drug court coordinator Field administrator Fugitive apprehension officer Human services counselor Job placement officer Mental health clinician Parole caseworker Parole officer Presentence investigator Probation officer Program officer Program specialist Programmer/analyst Psychologist Recreation coordinator Social worker Statistician Substance abuse counselor Unit leader Victim advocate Vocational instructor Warden/superintendent Youth services coordinator Youth supervisor Note: Consult the Appendix: Careers in Corrections at for the steps involved in career planning, developing employability and job readiness, and finding the right job. R I L E Y , A N G E L I Q U E 7 0 5 6 B U
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8 PART 1 Introduction to Corrections New prisons mean jobs and can contribute greatly to the health of local economies. Some economically disadvantaged towns—from Tupper Lake, in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York, to Edgefield, South Carolina—have cashed in on the prison boom, having successfully com- peted to become sites for new prisons. Until recently, the competition for new prison facilities is reminiscent of the efforts states made years ago to attract new automobile factories and other industries. CRIME AND CORRECTIONS The crimes that bring people into the American correctional system include felonies, misdemeanors, and minor law violations that are some- times called infractions. Felonies are serious crimes. Murder, rape, aggravated assault, rob- bery, burglary, and arson are felonies in all jurisdictions within the United States, although the names for these crimes may differ from state to state. A general way to think about felonies is to remember that a felony is a serious crime whose commission can result in confinement in a state or federal correctional institution for more than a year. In some states a felony conviction can result in the loss of certain civil privileges. A few states make conviction of a felony and the resulting incar- ceration grounds for uncontested divorce. Others prohibit convicted felony offenders from running for public office or owning a firearm, and some exclude them from professions such as medicine, law, and police work.
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