How do i know if two values are the same go back to

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How do I know if two values are the same? Go back to the pennies. If we compare only the average masses of the two pennies we see that they are different. But now include the uncertainty in the masses. For penny A, the most likely mass is somewhere between 3.117g and 3.125g. For penny B, the most likely mass is somewhere between 3.123g and 3.139g. If you compare the ranges of the masses for the two pennies, as shown in Figure 6, they just overlap. Given the uncertainty in the masses, we are able to conclude that the masses of the two pennies could be the same. If the range of the masses did not overlap, then we ought to conclude that the masses are probably different. Figure 6 Mass of pennies (in grams) with uncertainties An important application of this is determining agreement between experimental and theoretical values. If you use a formula to generate a theoretical value of some quantity and use the method below to generate the uncertainty in the calculation, and if you generate an experimental value of the same quantity by measuring it and use the method above to generate the uncertainty in the measurement, you can compare the two values in this way. If the ranges overlap, then the theoretical and experimental values agree. If the ranges do not overlap, then the theoretical and experimental values do not agree. Which result is more precise? Suppose you use a meter stick to measure the length of a table and the width of a hair, each with an uncertainty of 1 mm. Clearly you know more about the length of the table than the width of the hair. Your measurement of the table is very precise but your measurement of the width of the hair is rather crude. To express this sense of precision, you need to calculate the percentage uncertainty. To do this, divide the uncertainty in the measurement by the value of the measurement itself, and then multiply by 100%. For example, we can calculate the precision in the measurements made by class 1 and class 2 as follows: Precision of Class 1's value: (0.004 g ÷ 3.121 g) x 100% = 0.1 % Precision of Class 2's value: (0.008 g ÷ 3.131 g) x 100% = 0.3 % Class 1's results are more precise. This should not be surprising since class 2 introduced more uncertainty in their results by using six different balances instead of only one. Which result is more accurate? Accuracy is a measure of how your measured value compares with the real value. Imagine that class 2 244
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