Glencoe Health 2005.pdf

Sources national mental health association american

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Sources: National Mental Health Association; American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry HS_HEALTH_U03_C9_L2 12/6/03 9:10 AM Page 231
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Helping Others Suicidal people often believe that their death will not matter to anyone. For this reason, it is critical to show concern and empathy for someone who is talking about suicide. All talk of suicide must be taken seriously. Remember, the suicidal person needs profes- sional help—immediately. When you are with someone who appears to be suicidal, show you care by following these steps. Initiate a meaningful conversation. Showing interest and compassion for a person is an important first step. Listen closely to what that person says; be patient and understanding. Show support and ask questions. Remind the person that most problems have solutions. Make it clear that you understand that the person wants to end his or her pain, but emphasize that suicide is not the answer. Share the fact that most suicide survivors later express gratitude that they did not die. Try to persuade the person to seek help. Encourage the person to talk with a parent, counselor, therapist, or other trusted adult. Offer to go with the person to get help. 232 Chapter 9 Mental and Emotional Problems What Would You Do? Apply the six steps of the decision-making model to Jordan’s concerns. 1. State the situation. 2. List the options. 3. Weigh the possible outcomes. 4. Consider values. 5. Make a decision and act. 6. Evaluate the decision. Decision Making: When a Friend Seems Troubled When Ian started exhibiting signs of depression, his friend Jordan tried to persuade him to get help. Ian admitted that he was unhappy. However, he told Jordan, “I appreciate your trying to help me, but it’s okay; I’m handling my problems by myself.” Jordan knows that Ian is a private person, but Jordan has never seen his friend this “down” before. Jordan wants to tell someone about his concerns, but he is hesitant about betraying a confidence. Y ou can use CLUES to remember how to communi- cate effectively with a friend who is suffering emotionally. C onnect (Make contact.) L isten (Take time and pay attention.) U nderstand (Let the person know that you empathize with his or her feelings.) E xpress Concern (Say that you care, and stay with the person.) S eek Help (Encourage the person to talk to an adult, and tell an adult yourself.) Source: University of Minnesota Extension Service HS_HEALTH_U03_C9_L2 12/6/03 9:10 AM Page 232
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Multiple Suicides Sometimes within a teen population, occur. These are a series of suicides occurring within a short period of time and involving several people in the same school or community. Studies have shown that cluster suicides in the United States occur mainly among teens and young adults and may account for as much as 5 percent of all suicides in any given year. Some cluster suicides are the result of pacts or agreements between two or more people to take part in suicide. Others result when individuals commit suicide in response to the suicide of a friend or a suicide that has been sensationalized in the media.
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