21 also trust between managers and employees may be

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Ensari, 2014, p.21). Also, trust between managers and employees may be lost due to the absence of input from employees in decision-making (Lopez & Ensari, 2014, p.21). 3.22 Recruit a New Female CEO for Unilever Another solution for Unilever’s current leadership style problem could be to replace Polman with a female CEO, either from within the business or externally. Having a female CEO could assist Unilever’s mission to ‘empower women’ and address workplace diversity, thus resulting in a more socially responsible company and improving their reputation (Morris, 2018, p.305). It has also been shown that gender diversity in organisations leads to a workforce that is ‘adaptable and resilient’ (Morris, 2018, p.306), hence employees will be more accepting of changes a new leader may implement. However, it is unlikely that that Polman would be willing to step down from his position and it could potentially be viewed as discrimination for only allowing a female to obtain the position. Also, trust from employees may decrease if an outsider is brought in to lead the organisation to achieve their financial and sustainability objectives.
9 3.23 Implement a Laissez-Faire Leadership Style A final solution for the inappropriate leadership style could be to implement a laissez- faire style of leadership. Leaders who use a laissez-faire style of leadership only establish goals when needed and let employees be creative and responsible for themselves (Fiaz, et al., 2017, p.147). This could be beneficial to Unilever as it allows for creativity and thus, new ideas to arise and also has ‘significant positive impact’ on the motivation of workers, as highlighted in a study by Fiaz et al. (2017, p.152). However, in an organisation with 165,000 employees, it would be irresponsible and likely cause chaos if employees had complete freedom and minimal direction from managers (Sharma & Singh, 2013, p. 29). Also, employees are left to be accountable for their actions, which may result in them being less motivated. 3.3 Organising 3.31 Base Organisational Structure on Customer Departmentalisation A potential solution to make Unilever’s organisational structure allow for efficient operations could be adopting the philosophy of customer departmentalisation. Customer departmentalisation involves organising employees and departments based around types of customers that the company provides goods and services to (Williams et al, 2016, p.157). This could benefit Unilever in improving their sales growth as it involves specialised interactions with customers and thus, results in more personalised customer service (Griffin, 2014, p.159). Customer departmentalisation will also continue Unilever’s focus on people rather than focusing on business functions. However, if Unilever implement customer
10 departmentalisation it will not resolve the problem of duplicated resources across different departments, meaning it may not help to cut costs or reduce their environmental footprint. Also, a significant number of employees is required to coordinate activities between departments (Griffin, 2014, p.159), which would also impact business costs.

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