177 Pregnancy induced hypertension preeclampsia is an increase in blood

177 pregnancy induced hypertension preeclampsia is an

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177. Pregnancy-induced hypertension (preeclampsia) is an increase in blood pressure of 30/15 mm Hg over baseline or blood pressure of 140/95 mm Hg on two occasions at least 6 hours apart
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accompanied by edema and albuminuria after 20 weeks’ gestation. 178. Positive signs of pregnancy include ultrasound evidence, fetal heart tones, and fetal movement felt by the examiner (not u sually present until 4 months’ gestation) 179. Goodell’s sign is softening of the cervix. 180. Quickening, a presumptive sign of pregnancy, occurs between 16 and 19 weeks’ gestation. 181. Ovulation ceases during pregnancy. 182. Any vaginal bleeding during pregnancy should be considered a complication until proven otherwise. 183. To estimate the date of delivery using Nägele’s rule, the nurse counts backward 3 months from the first day of the last menstrual period and then adds 7 days to this date. 184. At 12 weeks’ gestation, the fundus should be at the top of the symphysis pubis. 185. Cow’s milk shouldn’t be given to infants younger than age 1 because it has a low linoleic acid content and its protein is difficult for infants to digest. 186. If jaundice is suspected in a neonate, the nurse should examine the infant under natural window light. If natural light is unavailable, the nurse should examine the infant under a white light. 187. The three phases of a uterine contraction are increment, acme, and decrement. 188. The intensity of a labor contraction can be assessed by the indentability of the uterine wall at the contraction’s peak. Intensity is graded as mild (uterine muscle is somewhat tense), moderate (uterine muscle is moderately tense), or strong (uterine muscle is boardlike). 189. Chloasma, the mask of pregnancy, is pigmentation of a circumscribed area of skin (usually over the bridge of the nose and cheeks) that occurs in some pregnant women. 190. The gynecoid pelvis is most ideal for delivery. Other types include platypelloid (flat), anthropoid (apelike), and android (malelike). 191. Pregnant women should be advised that there is no safe level of alcohol intake. 192. The frequency of uterine contractions, which is measured in minutes, is the time from the beginning of one contraction to the beginning of the next. 193. Vitamin K is administered to neonates to prevent hemorrhagic disorders because a neonate’s intestine can’t synthesize vitamin K. 194. Before internal fetal monitoring can be performed, a pregnant patient’s cervix must be dilated at least 2 cm, the amniotic membranes must be ruptured, and the fetus’s presenting part (scalp or buttocks) must be at station 1 or lower, so that a small electrode can be attached. 195. Fetal alcohol syndrome presents in the first 24 hours after birth and produces lethargy, seizures, poor sucking reflex, abdominal distention, and respiratory difficulty. 196. Variability is any change in the fetal heart rate (FHR) from its normal rate of 120 to 160 beats/minute. Acceleration is increased FHR; deceleration is decreased FHR.
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