Finally Nuttall 2015 stated that even though the BMI is not a reliable tool to

Finally nuttall 2015 stated that even though the bmi

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Finally, Nuttall (2015), stated that even though the BMI is not a reliable tool to assess mortality risk, as it does not consider comorbidities and other factors as family history of diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemias, and so on. Other contributing factors not considered by BMI include history of smoking, alcohol abuse, serious mental disorders, the duration of obesity, occupation, medication-induced obesity, and how comorbidities are being treated, all of the above are significant issues (Nuttall, 2015). References Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., Flynn, J. A., Solomon, B. S. & Stewart, R. W. (2015). Seidel's guide to physical examination (8th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017). About Adult BMI. . Daniels, S.R. (2009). The use of BMI in the clinical setting. Pediatrics. Vol. 124 (1). Pp. 35-41. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2008-3586F. Nuttall, F.Q. (2015). Body Mass Index - Obesity, BMI, and Health: A critical review. Nutrition Today. Vol. 50 (3). Pp. 117-128. DOI: 10.1097/NT.0000000000000092.
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Response 1 Jill, Great work on your discussion post. To adequately assess this child, there are a few questions that I would ask. I agree with you that assessing psychosocial variables and eating habits would play a key role in understanding the contributing factors to obesity and the need for education. Those questions include; 1. What is your day like? How often to you play outside and what do you do? 2. What is your favorite food? 3. How often do you eat home cooked meals? 4. How do you feel about your weight? To encourage the parents to be more proactive about this child’s health, I would provide teaching material about different food classes and how much of each class the child needs to maintain a healthy weight, using resources lie ‘choosemyplate’, encourage them to involve the child in meal preparations, eat meals together as often as possible, and encourage physical activity (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2018).
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