23 gorillas a powerfully built great ape with a large

Info icon This preview shows pages 2–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
23. Gorillas: a powerfully built great ape with a large head and short neck, found in the forests of central Africa. It is the largest living primate. 24. Chimpanzees: a great ape with large ears, mainly black coloration, and lighter skin on the face, native to the forests of western and central Africa. Chimpanzees show advanced behavior such as the making and using of tools. 25. Frogs: a tailless amphibian with a short squat body, moist smooth skin, and very long hind legs for leaping. 26. Amniote species: Amniotes are a clade of tetrapod vertebrates comprising the reptiles, birds, and mammals. Amniotes lay their eggs on land or retain the fertilized egg within the mother, and are distinguished from the anamniotes, which typically lay their eggs in water. Older sources, particularly prior to the 20th century, may refer to amniotes as
Image of page 2

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Amber Holmes-Turner Biology 2 "higher vertebrates" and anamniotes as "lower vertebrates", based on the discredited idea of the great chain of being. 27. Reptiles: a vertebrate animal of a class that includes snakes, lizards, crocodiles, turtles, and tortoises. They are distinguished by having a dry scaly skin and typically laying soft- shelled eggs on land. 28. Lepidosaurs species: are reptiles with overlapping scales. This subclass includes Squamata and Rhynchocephalia. It is a monophyletic group and therefore contains all descendents of a common ancestor. Squamata includes snakes, lizards, and amphisbaenia. Rhynchocephalia was a widespread and diverse group 220-100 million years ago; however, it is now represented only by the genus Sphenodon, which contains two species of tuatara, native to New Zealand. Lepidosauria is the sister taxon to Archosauria, which includes Aves and Crocodilia. Lizards and snakes are the most speciose group of Lepidosaurs and, combined, contain over 9,000 species. There are many noticeable distinguishing morphological differences between lizards, tuataras, and snakes. 29. Lizards: a reptile that typically has a long body and tail, four legs, movable eyelids, and a rough, scaly, or spiny skin. 30. Snakes: a long limbless reptile which has no eyelids, a short tail, and jaws that are capable of considerable extension. Some snakes have a venomous bite. 31. Alligators: a large semiaquatic reptile similar to a crocodile but with a broader and shorter head, native to the Americas and China. 32. Turtles: a slow-moving reptile, enclosed in a scaly or leathery domed shell into which it can retract its head and thick legs.2.a large marine reptile with a bony or leathery shell and flippers, coming ashore annually on sandy beaches to lay eggs.3.a freshwater reptile related to the turtles, typically having a flattened shell.Called terrapin in South Africa and India and tortoise in Australia. 33. Crocodiles: a large predatory semiaquatic reptile with long jaws, long tail, short legs, and a horny textured skin, using submersion and stealth to approach prey unseen. The crocodile has been extensively hunted for its valuable skin 34. Birds: warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrate distinguished by the possession of feathers, wings, and a beak and (typically) by being able to fly.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern