2Mutual veto consensus among the groups is required to confirm the majority

2mutual veto consensus among the groups is required

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2.Mutual veto - consensus among the groups is required to confirm the majority rule. Mutuality means that the minority is unlikely to successfully block the majority. If one group blocks another on some matter, the latter are likely to block the former in return.
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3. Proportional representation - based on population. If one pillar accounts for 30% of the overall society, then they occupy 30% of the positions on the police force, in civil service, and in other national and civic segments of society. 4. Segmental autonomy - creates a sense of individuality and allows for different culturally-based community laws .
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Favorable Conditions for Consociational Democracy 1. Segmental isolation of ethnic communities. 2. A multiple balance of power. 3. The presence of external threats common to all communities. 4. Overarching loyalties to the state. 5. A tradition of elite accommodation. 6. Socioeconomic equality. 7. A small population size, reducing the policy load. 8. A moderate multi-party system with segmental parties.
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The Formation of Malaysia UNITED IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS ECONOMIC COOPERATION COLLECTIVE FIGHT AGAINST COMMUNISM ETHNIC BALANCE & UNITY UNDERSTANDING FOR DEVELOPMENT INDEPENDENCE THROUGH UNIFICATIONS FACTORS
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Reactions Towards the Idea of Malaysia REACTIONS REACTIONS SINGAPORE BRUNEI BRUNEI BRITAIN BRITAIN MALAYA SABAH & SARAWAK SARAWAK
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Singapore: Well-accepted and everybody agreed with the formation of Malaysia. Lee Kuan Yew was most interested. Certain parties doubtful with the stability for Malaysia. In 1964, People Action Party received opposition from the United People’s Party (UPP) especially in the Hong Lim constituency by- election and Anson by-election. But it did not prevents the leaders in Singapore to agreed with Malaysia.
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Brunei: People of Brunei preferred to be independent on their own before join Malaysia. Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddin was interested with the idea for Malaysia But, he faced strong opposition from Ahmad M. Azahari, leader of Parti Rakyat Brunei (Brunei’s People Party). Azahari wanted to combine Brunei with North Borneo and Sarawak under the name of North Kalimantan.
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Sabah and Sarawak: The reaction was most encouraging.
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  • Fall '16
  • Sabah

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