When creating this song Kurtis Blow wanted to make an anthem for all the break

When creating this song kurtis blow wanted to make an

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When creating this song, Kurtis Blow wanted to make an anthem for all the break dancers around New York City in the early days of hip hop music. He came up with the idea for this song after listening to an old philosophical song that came from the 1920s. The concept behind that song was life has it good breaks and bad breaks, but don’t worry because there’s always tomorrow. The goal when producing this song was to have a lot of breaks throughout the song so while the breakers listened to the song, they would have chances to do show off their best moves. What makes this song so original was the fact that most rap songs during this early stage of hip hop relied on samples of older songs to structure the beat and rhythm of the song, but this song was created with all live instruments. Once Kurtis took this idea to his producers, they put it together while having some of the best musicians play the instruments. Kurtis Blow, J.B. Moore, and Robert Ford Jr. were able to get help from Larry Smith (he would go on top co- produce the studio album Run-D.M.C with Russell Simmons) to produce the song, John Tropea
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on the guitar, Jimmy Bralower on drums, Whodini played the bass, and Denzil Miller on keyboard. In conclusion, one should believe that this song was originally created for breaker dancers in New York City, but grew to become of the most revolutionary songs in the history of hip hop. It became the second 12 inch single to earn the gold certification when it was released. Kurtis Blow didn’t plan any marketing for this song, he just had plans to make a great record for his people and it eventually sold over 500,000 copies. As stated in the previous paragraph, another feature that made this rap song so unique during its time was the idea of using live instruments instead of a sample from a another song for it’s the development of its beat. This song was released in 1980, but influenced songs such as The Show/ La Di Da DI by Doug E. Fresh and The Get Fresh Crew, Fearless Four Rockin it, and many other songs. Without knowing it until it was released, Kurtis Blow had produced a song that would become part of the foundation for hip- hop and rap music today. Works Citied “Kurtis Blow.” Wikipedia , Wikimedia Foundation, 15 Jan. 2018, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurtis_Blow. “50 Greatest Hip-Hop Songs of All Time.” Rolling Stone , 5 Dec. 2012, - blow-the-breaks-19691231. “The Breaks by Kurtis Blow Songfacts.” Song Meanings at Songfacts , .
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  • Spring '18
  • Hip hop music, Kurtis Blow, instrumental portion of a song

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