6 how can managers resolve conflicts are there any

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6. How can managers resolve conflicts? Are there any differences in dealing with interpersonal and intergroup conflict? Do you know any technique of a programmed conflict? Managers resolve conflicts through various means as highlighted below: 1. Listen to both sides of the conflict 2. Understand and analyze the root cause of the conflict 3. Emotions should not be involved in resolving conflict 4. Try to bring a common ground acceptable to both parties 5. Encourage focused discussion and avoid heated arguments 6. Increasing communication for better decision making Interpersonal conflicts involve conflicts between two individuals and can be addressed by fo- cusing on both the viewpoints of the individuals. Intergroup conflicts involve conflicts between two different groups which consist of homogenous mix of members that have similar thought processes and viewpoints. It is difficult to resolve intergroup conflicts as it involves members with different temperaments.
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Programmed conflict encourages different opinions from the employees regardless of the personal feelings of the managers. This helps in defending the decisions while multiple peo- ple challenge it at the same time. 7. What are the most common perception problems in organizations? List and explain at least three. Why is it important for managers to have a working knowledge of perception? Commonly found perceptual errors are: 1. Managerial implications in hiring. Interviewers make hiring decisions based on their impression of how an applicant fits the perceived requirements of a job. Inaccurate impressions in either direction produce poor hiring decisions. 2. Managerial implications in performance appraisals. It is important for managers to accurately identify the behavioral characteristics and results indicative of good performance. Characteristics serve as the benchmark for evaluating employee performance. 3. Managerial implication in leadership roles. Good leaders exhibit the following behaviors; assigning specific tasks to group members, telling others they had done well, setting specific goals for the group, letting other group members make decisions, trying to get the group to work as a team and maintaining definite standards of performance. Poor leaders exhibit the following behaviors; telling others they had performed poorly, insisting on having their own way on doing things without explaining reasons why, and frequently changing plans. Many of the functions of a manager are directly influenced by perception and attribution processes. Whether managers assign an internal or external attribution to someone’s behavior may influence who the managers hire, how they evaluate the work performance of their employees, what type of training or skill development an employee is provided and the quality of their leadership and/or mentoring relationship. If managers inappropriately assign internal attributions to an employee’s performance deficiencies this will likely have a negative
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