ment convenience and compatibility with consumer lifestyles In addition

Ment convenience and compatibility with consumer

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ment, convenience, and compatibility with consumer lifestyles. In addition, Koivumaki (2001) found a positive relationship be- tween the Internet shopping experience and the amount of purchases made. Lee et al. (2003) found that shopping enjoyment and purchasing convenience were positively associated with online customer satisfac- tion. The perceived convenience offered by Internet vendors is often presented as a significant influence on the decision to pur- chase online. Convenience includes the time and effort saved by consumers (Ranganathan & Ganapathy, 2002; Swaminathan et al., 1999). Kim, Cho, and Rao (2000) analyzed data from the Octo- ber 1998 GVU Survey of Internet Usage. They found that a time-constrained lifestyle was positively associated with Internet pur- chasing behavior. They measured this time orientation by items related to saving time and effort. Swaminathan et al. (1999) also examined the October 1998 GVU Survey of Internet Usage. They found that con- sumers who valued convenience tended to use the Internet to make purchases more
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70 Journal of Global Information Management, 13(2), 66-88, April-June 2005 Copyright © 2005, Idea Group Inc. Copying or distributing in print or electronic forms without written permission of Idea Group Inc. is prohibited. often and to spend more money doing so. Similarly, Li, Kuo, and Russell (1999) re- ported that frequent Internet shoppers were convenience oriented. Other studies have also reported that limited discretionary time has a strong influence on a consumer’s decision to purchase online (Bellman, Lohse & Johnson, 1999; Vijayasarathy & Jones, 2000). Despite the perceived benefits in online shopping, there are a number of pos- sible negative factors associated with the Internet shopping experience. These in- clude the loss of sensory shopping or the loss of social benefits associated with shop- ping (Vijayasarathy & Jones, 2000). For example, Swaminathan et al. (1999) sug- gest that consumers’ social or behavioral orientation to shopping plays an important role in their propensity to engage in Internet shopping. In particular, so-called recre- ational shoppers, motivated by the social aspects of shopping, might find the Internet a less attractive medium for shopping since it generally allows for limited interaction compared to other retail formats. In their research, Swaminathan et al. (1999) found that the lack of social interaction in Internet shopping deterred consumers who pre- ferred dealing with people or who treated shopping as a social experience from pur- chasing online. The findings discussed above lead to the following hypotheses: H 2 : Consumers who place importance on the perceived benefits of Internet shopping are more likely to purchase online. H 3 : Consumers who place importance on the loss of social interaction in Internet shopping are less likely to purchase online.
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