The quality of the yolks and albumens thinner whites

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The quality of the yolks and albumens; thinner whites and flattened yolks are lower grade/quality than firmer and higher albumens and yolks. Quality is judged using candling, measuring Haugh units, and evaluating appearance. 18) What factors need to be controlled when cooking eggs? Temperature and time. Temperature should be low and/or cooking time should be short. 19) What happens to over-cooked eggs? Overcooked eggs become tough and rubbery, and shrink from dehydration. 20) At what temperature (approximately) does an egg coagulate? Egg whites first start to coagulate at about 140 degrees F and become completely coagulated at 149-158 degrees F. Egg yolks coagulate at 144-158 degrees F. 21) What factors influence the development of an egg-white foam? Age of egg, beating technique, temperature, type of bowl, careful separation of egg yolks and whites, and whether or not sugar, fluid, salt, or acid have been added 22) How should an egg white foam be incorporated into other ingredients? Egg white foams are used in desserts, or to aerate or leaven other products 23) Define the following terms from Chapter 11: a. Chalaza: ropy, twisted strands of albumen that anchor the yolk to center of thick egg white b. vitelline membrane: membrane surrounding the egg yolk and attached to the chalazae c. cuticle: waxy coating on an eggshell that seals the pores from bacterial contamination and moisture loss d. candling: a method of determining egg quality by examining eggs placed against a light e. Haugh units: a numerical value reflecting n eggs freshness, obtained by mathematically combining the thick albumen height with the ggs weight, then using a formula or table to convert this number into a Haugh unit f. value-added eggs: eggs on the market that are produced with the health of both the consumer and hen in mind Page 4 of 5
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g. emulsifying: a product that has one end of the molecule that attracts water and another that attracts fat h. binding: firming and stabilizing ingredients i. interfering: blocking formation of sugar or ice crystals j. clarifying: to make or become clear or pure k. prime (season): to seal the pores of a pan’s metal surface by coating the pan with a layer of oil and then heating it l. shirred eggs: whole eggs that are baked and served in individual dishes m. coddled eggs: eggs that are prepared by breaking an egg into a small cup made of porcelain or heat-proof glass with a screw-on top n. poached eggs: eggs that are cooked by being cracked into and simmered in enough water to cover the egg by at least twice its depth o. meringue: egg white foam used in dessert dishes as a pie topping, cake layer, or frosting p. syneresis or weeping: extraction of liquid from a gel q. beading: the formation of tiny syrup droplets on the surface of a baked meringue r. storage eggs: eggs that are treated with a light coat of oil or plastic and stored in high humidity at low refrigerator temperatures very close to the egg’s freezing point Page 5 of 5
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  • Summer '17
  • Tracy Grgich

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