How each setting differs in which context its in at

Info icon This preview shows pages 2–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How -- each setting differs in which context it’s in (at school - eat snacks / at home - eat a meal) Why - setting differs for each culture / religious reasons/ Public sphere- workforce, social environment, community Private sphere- home and family life Food crosses social boundaries: both spheres, can be personal/intimate or public socializing Dietary laws Jewish Dietary Laws: marking religious and cultural (ethnic) differences Reasons: Religious Religious Interpretation The law giver sternly forbade all animals of land, sea, or air whose flesh is the finest and fattest, like that of pig and scaleless fish, knowing that they set a trap for the most slavish of the senses, the taste, and that they produce gluttony, and evil dangerous to both soul and body, for gluttony begets indigestion, which is the source of all illnesses and infirmities Health Ecological Characteristics of Jewish dietary laws: Most elaborate For the entire Jewish population What is Kosher Food Kosher (permitted) Animals that chew their cud and have closen hooves; ritually slaughtered cows, sheep, goats, and deer with no flaws or diseases Domesticated fowl such as chicken, turkey, quail, geese Salmon, tuna, carp, herring, cod Meat eaten separately from dairy Wine or grape juice made under Jewish supervision Soft cheese and kosher hard cheese Food taboos Cultural food taboos: the “Hua” people in Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea:
Image of page 2

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
No foods like cat and dog for pregnant women The Sacred Cow in Hinduism Indian constitution, article 48 o Organization of agriculture and animal husbandry: the state shall endeavor to organize agriculture and animal husbandry on modern and scientific lines and shall, in particular Slow food o Who: everyone in the whole world that reacts to fast food o What: global direct response to American fast food; some parts of the world resisted to fast food (Oaxaca, MX) & Bra (town that had book about slow food movement) o When: 1990’s o Where: globally, but started in USA o How: relates to how people see what their preference is (slow or fast food)/ American way of life = opposite of Slow Food Manifesto o Why: even after all these movements and resistance, fast food still managed to expand/ slow food can be done still at home and can be a culturally thing/ farmer markets are still on the line and is increasing Alice Waters Who: American chef, restaurateur, activist & author and owner of famous restaurant for its organic, locally grown ingredients and for pioneering CA cuisine U.S. representative of slow food Where: Berkeley CA How - evolution of change (didn’t care about GMOs vs GMOs topic now)/ introduces Why - importance of change (no GMOs vs GMOs)/ labeling/ healthier choices Feast / fast The absence of food is as important as its presence.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern