A quality assessment tool was developed for these studies review and was based

A quality assessment tool was developed for these

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A quality assessment tool was developed for these studies review and was based on criteria that were transferable to non- randomized clinical trail studies from the COCHRANE risk of Across 14 studies over the past 10 years. Focused on staffing which was measured by the total hours per day per nurse and patient outcomes. SPSS Version 2.0 was used to analyze statistical description, correlation and reliability estimates. SEM was utilized to explore the impact of the hospital organizational factors such as nursing care left undone, and nurse burnouts effects on patient safety. Preliminary data collection via SPSS Version 22 software. Descriptive statistics and bivariate associations were utilized for variables and demographics such as length of time at job and typical hours worked per week. For examination of associations between depressive symptoms and patient safety perceptions the use of AMOS 22 was utilized.
LITERATURE EVALUATION 5 bias tool along with other measures to assess reliability and validity of the measures used. Key Findings The majority of studies provided evidence that both wellbeing and burnout are associated with patient safety. In particular, poor wellbeing, as characterized by depression, anxiety, poor quality of life and stress and high levels of burnout were found to significantly be associated with more self-reported errors. A similar percentage of studies found significant associations between wellbeing and error (88.9%), as well as burnout and error (83.3%). Evidence suggestive that better staffing for nurses was associated with fewer hospital acquired pressure injuries, catheter associated UTI, surgical site infections, sepsis and heart failure. Better staffing also reported higher quality of care and less job dissatisfaction and nurse burnout. Nurses currently averaged about 7 patients per day shift, with 6-12 average nursing tasks on average per nurses that was left undone due to inadequate time. Additionally, 2/5ths of the nurses reported high levels of burnout. Patient adverse effects occurred infrequently as assessed by most of the nurses. Better work environments were also associated with less nursing care left undone and nurse burn out. Results are suggestive that symptoms of depression and burnout in hospital nurses may have implications on patient safety. Additionally, interventions to improve patient safety may be used to improve burnout. That not only is there an association between depressive symptoms and patient safety perceptions, but that depressive symptoms were considered an outcome from burnout. Recomm endation s Findings that burnout and poor wellbeing are both associated with poorer patient safety and has significant implications for policymakers and management teams within the healthcare setting.

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