demonstrates her utter indifference to the wellbeing of blacks when she reveals

Demonstrates her utter indifference to the wellbeing

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demonstrates her utter indifference to the wellbeing of blacks when she reveals to Huck that she considers it “lucky”( Adventures of Huckleberry Finn , p.379) that no “people”( Adventures of Huckleberry Finn , p.379) died. When Aunt Sally shortly afterwards bemoans the similar fate of a white man, it demonstrates the hypocrisy of her previous kindness towards Jim. To the Phelps, slaves are little more than property that can be stolen, borrowed or locked away. Religious hypocrisy Religious hypocrisy and its portrayal in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn constitute Twain’s greatest indictment of American society in the 1830s. This was a society which for Twain was shrouded in a veil of self-deception and where its practitioners preached hypocritical and absurd religious values. These traits, which are exemplified in characters such as the Widow Douglas, Miss Watson and Silas Phelps are satirically exposed throughout the novel. These people are all well-intentioned Christians, but their religion has deceived them into thinking that slavery is perfectly acceptable, and that slaves are something less than people. The Watson sisters are one of the most prominent examples of this type of hypocrisy in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn . Early in the novel (chapter 3) Huck observes
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