participatory cultural experience ie end users generating content and metadata

Participatory cultural experience ie end users

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participatory cultural experience i.e. end users generating content and metadata for museums and cultural institutions [13]. Furthermore, recent studies discuss the learning value of engaging museum visitors with creating con- tent for location based games that can be played in cultural in- stitutions [14,15]. A second motivation is that a multitude of location-based mobile games have been designed and developed, while there is virtually an unlimited number of locations in which these games can be played. All these gaming applications need, in one way or another, digital content for each of the locations in which they are played. In addition they need some methods to label all real- world physical elements (e.g. objects, locations, landmarks etc.) that take part in the game (e.g. with QR tags, RFID codes, GPS sensors etc.). In addition, for each specific location there is often a need to create different content sets, depending on who the target audi- ence is (i.e. school pupils, visiting adults etc.) or on the overall aim of the activity. Usually tools that assist creation or editing of content for these games are tailored to each specific game. This observation lead us to realize the importance of a generic tool that could be used by end users or other third parties to au- thor content for location-based games that aim at supporting learning. An example of such tools from the domain of tradi- tional video games is Valve Hammer Editor for games built on top of Valve's Source Engine [5]. Ideally, such a tool would allow the users to create content for any type of location-based game that challenges the players to link the real world with entities of the digital realm, and allow that game to be played in any location. Such a content editor would allow developers of location-based games to launch their games in a large number of locations, but it would also allow other interested parties, such as educators, curators, or residents of an area to create end-user content for existing games. The main goal was, therefore, to design and develop a ge- neric application that can function as a tool for creating and ed- iting content for location-based mobile games. In order to achieve this, one of the first requirements was that the tool should support as many location-based mobile games as possi- ble. To meet this goal, the first step was to analyze existing mo- bile location-based games, with special focus in linking games, 2014 International Conference on Interactive Mobile Communication Technologies and Learning (IMCL) 978-1-4799-4742-3/14/$31.00 ©2014 IEEE November 13-14, 2014, Thessaloniki, Greece Page 280
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as discussed next. After having analyzed the operation of these games, the next step was to generate a suitable model that would inform the design of the application. Finally, once these steps were carried out and a sketch of the content editor had been de- signed, the tool was built and tested in an initial evaluation study.
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