O some mobile devices eg notebook computers and

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o Some mobile devices (e.g., notebook computers and tablets) have integrated cellular antennas. o USB cellular adapters can be connected to most mobile devices to provide cellular access. Cellular networking is a truly mobile solution. You can often be moving and still have Internet access without manually having to reconnect. Internet access is limited to areas with cell phone coverage. Coverage will be dictated by the service provider's network. Cellular networks used for voice and data include the following types: 2G (second generation) networks were the first to offer digital data services. 2G data speeds are slow (14.4 Kbps) and were used mainly for text messaging and not Internet connectivity. o 2.5G was an evolution that supported speeds up to 144 Kbps. o EDGE (also called 2.75G) networks are an intermediary between 2G and 3G networks. EDGE is the first cellular technology to be truly Internet compatible, with speeds between 400 and 1,000 Kbps. 3G (third generation) offers simultaneous voice and data. The minimum speed for stationary users is quoted at 2 Mbps or higher. 4G (fourth generation) offers minimum speeds of around 38 Mbps, with up to 100 Mbps possible. Satellite Satellite networking uses radio signals sent and received from a satellite. Satellite networking: Uses a transmitter with an antenna (dish) directed skywards to a satellite
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Requires line-of-sight to the satellite (dish placement is crucial) Is affected by mild atmospheric and weather conditions (fog, rain, or snow can disrupt service) May have a long delay time (latency) between requests and downloads Can be a portable solution for cars or trucks with an attached satellite dish Provides nearly 100% global coverage Some satellite Internet access solutions are limited to download only. Another solution, such as dial-up, is required to provide upload capabilities. Line of site Line of site Internet access (also called fixed wireless broadband ) is similar to satellite Internet; however, instead of antennas being directed to a satellite in orbit, they are pointed at a large antenna on land. The antennas use radio signals--typically microwaves--to transmit and receive data. Line of site Internet: Requires a direct line of site between two fixed antennas. A single, large antenna provides connections for all subscribers in an area Provides Internet access without needing to run cables or lines to each subscriber's premise Can provide Internet to remote areas by installing a single antenna As with satellite networking, line of site is affected by weather conditions Offers speeds of up to 1520 Mbps Be aware of the following regarding Internet access: Regardless of the method, Internet connections are made from the subscriber location to an Internet Service Provider (ISP). The ISP might be the cable TV company, the phone company, or another company offering Internet access.
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