More consideration needs to be given to women who are unable to breastfeed or

More consideration needs to be given to women who are

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More consideration needs to be given to women who are unable to breastfeed or choose not to. We should continue to provide evidence-based information to support a woman in making the best-informed feeding choice for her baby. The mental health of a woman cannot be relegated to a lower priority than Australian National Breastfeeding Strategy: 2018 and Beyond – Report on public consultation (DRAFT) – October 2018 28
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Issue Number of comments Examples of comments breastfeeding her baby. Maintain a respect for those women who cannot or choose not to breastfeed without ridicule or backlash. Baby-Friendly Health Initiative 8 Fund BFHI accreditation for hospitals and community health services. There is no mention of the 7-Point Plan for the Protection, Promotion and Support of Breastfeeding in Community Health Services. Needs to be included. Maintaining BFHI accreditation in Tasmania has been invaluable. We have seen a steady but small increase in initiation but ongoing challenge with exclusive breastfeeding is due to complex pregnancy and birth outcomes and early parenting stresses. BFHI national accreditation should be in the Structural part of the Strategy Logic. Breastfeeding in ECEC services 8 Early childhood education and care legislation and EYLF curriculum should include infants. Currently, infants are mainly invisible despite their highly specific needs – covered under the term ‘children’. ECEC services should have an infant feeding policy in line with the Infant Feeding Guidelines/ WHO Guidelines. Currently there is no legislation that requires this. ECEC updated training required across registered training organisations, universities, services. Fund the national implementation of the Breastfeeding Friendly Child Care initiative piloted by the ABA, UNSW, Flinders University and ANU. Targeted support 8 Peer support is more than telephone help especially for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups of which Australia currently has 800 languages spoken at home. Bilingual peer support would aim for sensitive addressing of dominant cultural needs. Would also be good to focus on support & education for Aboriginal health workers to be confident & accurate in offering support to mums & encourage them to breastfeed in communities. The ‘Hey Mum’ 3 year funded project to provide educated peer support for young mums in North West Tasmania showed that this was an effective strategy to improve breastfeeding within a vulnerable group. I would encourage this strategy with young mums and Aboriginal people. Partner support 7 The support of my husband especially in those first few weeks where breastfeeding seemed to take up all of our time was the biggest contributing factor to our success. There is no mention of fathers in participation. Given the evidence behind the support of partners, this is Australian National Breastfeeding Strategy: 2018 and Beyond – Report on public consultation (DRAFT) – October 2018 29
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Issue Number of comments Examples of comments an important inclusion.
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