Attitudes and attitude change 3 components cognitive

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Attitudes and Attitude Change 3 components cognitive, affective, and behavioral Factors in changing attitudes source, message, and receiver Theories of attitude change Learning theory Dissonance theory Self-perception theory Elaboration likelihood model
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Figure 16.9 The possible components of attitudes
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Measuring the Components of an Attitude
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Changing Attitudes: The Persuasion Process
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Cognitive Dissonancy Theory Festinger and Carlsmith Study (1959)
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Figure 16.12 Design of the Festinger and Carlsmith (1959) study
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From “Cognitive Dissonance and Attitude Change” from “Cognitive Consequences of Forced Compliance” by L. Festinger and J.M. Carlsmith, from Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology , 58, 203-210. Cognitive Dissonance and Attitude Change
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Cognitive Dissonancy Theory When will behavior-attitude inconsistency produce attitude change? Inconsistency causes distress or discomfort. Changing attitude will reduce this distress or discomfort. What causes this discomfort? Threat to positive self-concept.
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Bem’s Self-Perception Theory Challenge to cognitive dissonance theory. Does not assume experience of discomfort. When unsure of attitude, infer from behavior. Problems with theory: Inconsistency does produce physiological arousal People adjust attitudes even when unable to reflect on behavior. Theory applies best when no prior attitude or only a slight discrepancy.
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Figure 16.13 Bem’s self-perception theory
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Elaboration Likelihood Model Two routes to attitude change Central Peripheral Which route is followed?
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