Although Jane does not realize it her remark touches the heart of the matter

Although jane does not realize it her remark touches

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Although Jane does not realize it, her remark touches the heart of the matter” (Pell 408). Moreover she also objects to him buying her expensive clothes and jewels, as she is afraid she may lose her identity and distinctiveness, and become another Blanche Ingram or his ex-mistress Celine Varens to him. “Do you remember what you said of Celine Varens? Of the diamonds, the cashmeres you gave her? I will not be your English Celine Varens. I will continue to act as Adele’s governess; by that I shall earn my own board and lodging, and thirty pounds a year besides. I shall furnish my own wardrobe out of that money” (Bronte 308). She loves Rochester very much, but does not allow him to dress her up like a doll and take away from her uniqueness or to allow him to
mold her into his vision of her. Jane makes it a point that her personality shall determine her social standing rather than her fiance’s wealth and name. By refusing to accept his gifts, she maintains her independence and uses this opportunity to confirm that she loves Rochester for the right reasons. Readers are given another look into Jane’s morality when she finds out that her future husband already has a wife. Instead of accepting his offer to live with him regardless, she gives self-respect priority and makes the difficult decision to leave Thornfield and the man who she has come to idolize and manages to make a good life for herself. The next phase of Jane’s life begins at Moor House. As she makes a new home for herself among Diana, Mary and St. John who took her in. She realizes that she can accomplish a balance between society and autonomy. As she develops a fresh sense of rapport and belonging, she comes to terms with the fact that she can give and receive love without being romantically involved. It is here she discovers that she is an heiress and that her friends are really her relatives. She also resumes teaching poor children. By all appearances she is happy, yet when St. John proposes to her, she turns him down because he does not love her, nor
she him. By doing so she remains true to herself and is able to avoid yet another threat to her independence. Having escaped an almost loveless marriage to St. John, she now treasures what Rochester offered her all the more and realizes the significance of following her head as well as her heart. She goes back to him and marries him, because now she does not feel like she will be beholden to her husband. “She must have the advantages of both love and freedom, sex and survival, security and independence. And in marrying the maimed Rochester […] she manages to get them both” (Momberger 368). When Jane left Gateshead, she simply longed for freedom. As the story progresses she longs for love and approval as well. She grows from a lonely child into an expressive woman with friends. Jane struggled to be viewed as more than what her social class and looks would allow her.

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