It might also be considered ethymematic the argument

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It might also be considered ethymematic: the argument is not essentially emotional, but merely relies on suppressed or absent premisses for its logical standing: \What Jack is really saying is that he will be a good husband, and that he is devoted to Jill, and that ...] And, indeed, Jack may well assent to some such conjunction if presented to him. But the fact that [5] can be paraphrased into a logical argument does not make it one; it is an emotional one, its force and persuasive power come almost entirely from its emotional aspect. To try and construe it otherwise is to force a square peg into a round hole. Jack's argument, whether considered a good one or not, is perfectly well understood, and in order to understand it we do not reduce it to logical terms. Note that there is here no objection to Jackgs having made an argument ± there is a clear reason and claim, and in that sense is perfectly logical. However, Jackgs reason is not logical, its source is an introspection of his emotional state. By being aware of this we are in a better position to analyze and judge the argument. Consider the next example. Example 6. Paula is sitting in Professor Tome's office. She is pleading for an 'A' in his logic course. "Don't you see," she explains plaintively, tears in her eyes, "if I don't get an 'A' in your course I won't make medical school, and my life will be ruined. I won't have anything left to live for." Example [6] is an example of a primarily emotional argument. Paula's appeal is essentially based on her desire to go to medical school and its emotional importance to her, as opposed to her academic ability to meet the entrance requirements. The reason she provides Professor Tome is the earnestness of her longing, the strength of her desire. \ If only he understands how important it is to me, surely he will grant my wish. ] Her argument includes as one relatively minor part the words she uses, but also involves the illustration by use of her body and human emotional communication devices just how crucial her grade is to her. Other examples could bring forth the tantrums of children, the despair of rejected suitors, or the plaints of frustrated spouses. All the same, whatever the reader's paradigmatic case, the point remains: emotional arguments are arguments that rely more or less heavily on the use and expression of emotion. These emotions are often communicated to us without benefit of language, or where language is purely ancillary to the main thrust of the communication. Naturally, there are great questions of degree: communications will be more or less emotional running from highly or nearly pure emotional states to ones that are hardly emotional at all. Emotional arguments are central to human disputation. They communicate to us aspects of a dispute partner's world that logical arguments do not. These include such elements as degree of commitment, depth and extent of feeling, sincerity, and degree of resistance. These are important, nay vital, components in communicating a position. Imagine, if you will, how
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