On average people ate 112 MMs from the one pound bag and 156 from the two pound

On average people ate 112 mms from the one pound bag

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member. "On average, people ate 112 M&Ms from the one-pound bag and 156 from the two-pound bag," says Wansink. Likewise, the average person ate roughly half a tub of popcorn, whether it was medium or jumbo (which held twice as much). "People can often eat about 50 percent more of Courtesy of Virginia Commonwealth University • Richmond, Virginia Made possible through the generous support of the National Academy of Sciences & the Pfizer Foundation Fighting Fat – New Ways to Win Page 7 of 15
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hedonistic foods like candy, chips, and popcorn when they come in bigger packages," says Wansink ( ) Activity 3: Extending the Investigation – Using the Internet In this activity students “order” from a fast-food restaurant and use the Internet to determine the calories and fat content of the items they ordered. Depending upon expected length of assignment, students could also make a comparison with an “order” from a sit-down restaurant, such as one of the restaurants with a pick-up menu. Materials Copies of the student handout, “Extending the Investigation – Using the Internet” Computers with Internet access List of Web sites for nutritional information from fast-food restaurant Procedure 1. Adjust the Web site list to include fast-food restaurants in your area. 2. Make arrangements for students to have access to computers with Internet capability. Note: Some of the food calculators on the fast food Web sites may be difficult to use. Nutritional information for food items can also be obtained by searching for them on a search engine, such as and typing in, for example, “McDonalds ¼ pounder with cheese”. Discussion Discuss students’ responses to the questions on their handout. Ask: “Has this activity affected what you might order the next time you visit a fast-food restaurant?” Courtesy of Virginia Commonwealth University • Richmond, Virginia Made possible through the generous support of the National Academy of Sciences & the Pfizer Foundation Fighting Fat – New Ways to Win Page 8 of 15
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Student Handout 1: What’s in it for me? In this activity you will learn to read a nutritional label and judge the nutritional value of your chosen snack food. Note: Sample answers are based on the example of a nutritional label on the right. 1. What is the total number of calories in a serving? __________ In the example: 170 calories 2. What is the number of grams of fat on your nutritional label? ________ In the example: 1g 3. What is the number of grams of protein on your nutritional label? ________ In the example: 4g 4. To find the number of usable grams of carbohydrate subtract the dietary fiber from the total number of carbohydrates. Carbohydrate grams? ________ In the example: 41g – 5g = 36g 5. Multiply the grams of fat by 9 calories (why?) _______ This is your total fat calories. In the example: 9c 6. Multiply the grams of protein by 4 calories (why?)______ This is your total protein calories. In the example: 16c 7. Multiply the grams of carbohydrates by 4 calories (why?)______
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  • Fall '19
  • Nutrition, National Academy of Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University, Pfizer Foundation

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