A sequence of k t with k release inaudible 113 712

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Medical Terminology for Health Professions
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 1.66
Medical Terminology for Health Professions
Ehrlich
Expert Verified
A sequence of [k t], with [k] release inaudible. 113 7.12 ‘City’, [ s i], as produced by a speaker from southern Michigan (IPA) 115 7.13 Material for exercise 2 117 8.1 Annotated waveforms for the first 300 ms of ‘sip’ as produced by an RP speaker (IPA) 121 8.2 Annotated waveforms for the first 300 ms of ‘zip’ as produced by an RP speaker (IPA) 121 8.3 Spectrograms of ‘sip’ (left) and ‘zip’ (right) (RP) (IPA) 122 8.4 ‘Fie’ (New Zealand) (IPA) 123 8.5 ‘Vie’ (New Zealand) (IPA) 123 8.6 ‘Fie’ (left) and ‘vie’ (right) as spoken by a New Zealander (IPA) 124 8.7 Spectrogram of ‘looser’, with friction (FRIC) and the offset and onset of voicing (V off, V on) marked 126 8.8 Spectrogram of ‘loser’, with friction (FRIC) and the offset and onset of voicing (V off, V on) marked 126 8.9 ‘Sigh’ and ‘shy’ as spoken by a male Australian speaker. Note the lower frequency energy for [ ʃ ] than for [s] (IPA) 129 8.10 ‘Kids do i[ θ ]’. Speaker: 18-year-old male, Dublin (IViE file f1mdo) 133 FIGURES AND TABLES ix
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Medical Terminology for Health Professions
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 1.66
Medical Terminology for Health Professions
Ehrlich
Expert Verified
8.11 ‘I don’t smo[x]e’. Speaker: 18-year-old male, Liverpool (IViE file f1sgw) 134 9.1 Co-ordination of articulations in nasal + vowel sequences 140 9.2 Initial part of ‘map’, [mæ-] (RP) (IPA) 141 9.3 Co-ordination of articulations in vowel + nasal sequences 142 9.4 Vowel + nasal portion from the word ‘hang’ [(h)æ ˜ ŋ ] . Speaker: Australian male (IPA) 142 9.5 ‘The more (he blew)’. Speaker: RP female (IPA) 143 9.6 ‘Bottom’ [b ɑɾə m] and ‘button’ [b t n n]. Speaker: Australian male (IPA) 149 10.1 Spectrogram of a click (from extract (5)) 157 10.2 ‘Week’. Pulmonic (1); ejective (2). Female speaker 166 10.3 The word ‘good’, [ u d], in Jamaican Creole (IPA) 168 Tables 3.1 Systematic transcription of English consonants 26 4.1 Average f0 values (Baken and Orlikoff 2000) 46 5.1 Anglo-English vs. American homophones 66 5.2 Vowels in English keywords 67 6.1 Approximants in English at the systematic level 78 7.1 Plosives in English 96 7.2 Differences between [t + r] and [t ɹ ] 111 7.3 Phonetic characteristics of voicing with English plosives 116 8.1 Fricatives in English 118 8.2 Voiced and voiceless fricatives 125 8.3 Fricatives from undershoot 135 9.1 English nasals 138 x AN INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH PHONETICS
To readers Immediately I had agreed to write a book with the title ‘Introduction to the Phonetics of English’, I realised that describing the phonetics of ‘English’ is problematic because English is so phonetically hetero- geneous. So the result is a book that is more about phonetics, with illus- trations from around the English-speaking world. It is not a complete description of any one variety; rather, my intention has been to try to provide enough of a descriptive phonetic framework so that readers can describe their own variety in reasonable detail. I have tried in this book to concentrate on how to go about about doing phonetics, and to show how phonetics can inform our under- standing of categories like ‘voicing’, and explain sound changes like the vocalisation of laterals, and how phonetic details relate to meaning and linguistic structure on many levels. I have tried to take a broad view of what ‘meaning’ is, so the book is not limited to phonemes and allophones.

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