MSL101L08 Seven Army Values and Warrior Ethos SR.pdf

Respect as an army officer you are charged with

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Respect As an Army officer, you are charged with promoting dignity, fairness, and equal opportunity for others. Respect means treating people as they should be treated and as you expect to be treated. It requires having regard for others' well-being, feelings, and needs. Selfless Service Selfless service means placing Army priorities before your own. You consider the welfare of the nation, your mission, and your fellow Soldiers and subordinates before your personal safety. Selfless service means a willingness to sacrifice for the country, the Army, and your unit. This does not mean that you forget about the needs of your family or yourself. Selfless service prevents a narrow, ambitious focus on careerism for gain or glory. This value guides you in giving credit where credit is due and sharing your successes. Honor Your honor is your most valuable possession; if you lose it, everything else is worthless. In military service, honor is probably the prime motivation for your actions and underlies the other six Army Values. Honor compels you to adhere to the Army Values and gives you the ability to make moral decisions based on your deep personal values and your conscience. Honor requires you to exceed standards whenever possible and uphold the Soldier's Creed and your oath as an officer. Strive to uphold your honor in all you do. 3
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Integrity Integrity means "completeness" and "wholeness." Integrity leads you to unity and consistency in your principles, values, and behavior. It requires you to be candid and sincere with your peers, subordinates, and superiors. Integrity calls upon you to be honest and honorable in word and deed at all times. The character of a leader with integrity permits nothing less than doing the right thing. If you are going to instill the Army Values in others, then you must first demonstrate them. Remember, if you are ever in doubt, a leader may consult a mentor with respected values and judgment. Personal Courage A wise leader once said that courageous people are afraid, too-they just hold on for a minute longer. You can exhibit two types of courage. Physical courage enables you to face fear, danger, and adversity in any situation. Moral courage means acting with honor, respecting others, and taking responsibility for your actions and decisions. In the Army, you get a medal for acting bravely. But decorations are merely cloth and metal symbols of your inner strength of character that leads to courageous acts. Conclusion You have learned that seven core Army Values guide leaders' and Soldiers' actions. In analyzing each of these values, you understand that they also reflect the nation's values. Charged with the defense of the nation, when faced with applying the Army Values as a leader, you recognize that you have a greater responsibility and face more challenges than the ordinary citizen faces.
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