N be t we en a utho r and r eader and makes peo p l e

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n be t we en a utho r and r eader and makes peo p l e cons i de r the a ud i e nc e which a l s o influences the writer's topic choice and revision. On t he other hand, r e a de rs ma k e use o f it by investiga t i ng a nd quest i o ning the a uthor 's pu r pose a nd s t y l e. 4) Ae sthe t i c k nowl e d ge which 59 implies certain alliterate styles, interjections, length which echo in the readers and writers cars and affect their choices. 5) Process knowledge which makes readers and writers aware of their writing/reading process which helps then to make conscious decisions about revising and the strategy to use in rereading CREATIVE WRITING Creative writing is considered to be any writing, fiction, poetry, or non-fiction, that goes outside the bounds of normal professional, journalistic, academic, and technical forms of literature. Works which fall into this category include novels, epics, short stories, and poems. Writing for the screen and stage, screenwriting and playwriting respectively, typically have their own programs of study, but fit under the creative writing category as well. Creative writing is any form of writing which is written with the creativity of mind: fiction writing, poetry writing, creative nonfiction writing and more. The purpose is to express something, whether it be feelings, thoughts, or emotions. Rather than only giving information or inciting the reader to make an action beneficial to the writer, creative writing is written to entertain or educate someone, to spread awareness about something or someone, or to express one’s thoughts. There are two kinds of creative writing: good and bad, effective and ineffective. Bad, ineffective creative writing cannot make any impression on the reader. It won’t achieve its purpose. To write creatively, you only have to write about topics that aren’t academic (think social studies papers or science lab reports), journalistic (newspapers and magazine articles), technical forms of literature (encyclopedias, manuals, factual books), and professional (writing for a company). ESSAY WRITING An essay is a short academic composition. The word “essay” is derived from a French word “essai” or “essayer,” which mean “trail.” In composition, however, an essay is a piece of non-fiction writing that talks or discusses a specific topic. Presently, essay is part of every degree program. Each subject has specific requirements for the essays to be written. Some subjects need longer essays, while others need shorter ones, such as a five-paragraph essay. Four Major Types of Essays Distinguishing between types of essays is simply a matter of determining the writer’s goal. Does the writer want to tell about a personal experience, describe something, explain an issue, or convince the reader to accept a certain viewpoint? The four major types of essays address these purposes: 1. Narrative Essays: Telling a Story In a narrative essay , the writer tells a story about a real-life experience. While telling a story may sound easy to do, the narrative essay challenges students to think and write about themselves. When writing a narrative essay, writers should try to involve the
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