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5 subject should stand straight with arms away from

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5. Subject should stand straight with arms away from body but at sides. 6. Catcher will instruct subject to fall. 7. Catcher must bend knees when catching subject so the subject completely drops almost to the floor during test. Catcher must do this without dropping subject. Catcher may need a few practice catches to find best positioning. 8. Immediately after the trust fall the subject must sit down and have their blood pressure taken, again following the protocol outlined in the University of Oregon Biology 212 lab manual (Carrier, 2013). Results After examining the data collected from this test it was found that the systolic blood pressure did increase before and after the experiment was preformed as shown in figure 1. In addition table 1 shows that diastolic did not change before and after the experiment. The p-value for systolic blood pressure (found in table 1) change proves that the data collected has less than 5% probability that the change is due to chance; this means that there is a significant difference before and after the experiment.
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Marla Waters BI 212 Control Systolic Active Systolic Control Diastolic Active Diastolic Mean 123.25 131.85 67.45 67.775 Std. Dev 16.21 17.46 9.87 11.07 P-Value 8.5E-06 0.80 Table 1 : Averages and standard deviations for diastolic and systolic blood pressures before and after performing a “trust fall”. All values are in mm Hg. P-values that were calculated using paired t-test are also shown. Figure 1 : Comparison of control and experimental systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Discussion The results do support the hypothesis. The hypothesis that systolic blood pressure will increase after a “trust fall” was supported by our results, which showed an 8.6 mm Hg increase in resting systolic and after the activity. The p-value for systolic blood pressure was under 0.05, which proves that the increase was a result of the experiment, performed. Our data also supported the second part of the hypothesis, that diastolic will not change after a “trust fall”. There was a 0.325 increase from resting diastolic to active diastolic. In addition the diastolic p-value is more than 0.05, which shows the increase is likely due to chance and not as a result of the experiment preformed.
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