The collected wisdom of generations could vanish in a

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situations or died in the same manors. “The collected wisdom of generations could vanish in a matter of days if sickness struck older members…” The Indians, Europeans, and African’s weren’t immune or truly more sufficient in adapting than the other. Overall, I agreed with Merrell’s perspective. A lot of times in readings, we see either a bias for the Indians or the Natives, but this was very neutral. “Natives unable to live without the English henceforth tried to live with them” explains the very idea that neither one suffered/benefited from one another. There was give and take on both parties, and I feel that after all of the research done and acquired, that is a more accurate description of the interaction between the Native Americans and Europeans. Both sides exchanged ideas and cultures in order to begin the forming of American culture. I also feel that this is the most accurate description because there was even an acknowledgement of Africans having a part in building the culture as well. “Colonial history often remains ‘a history of those men and women---English, European, and African---who transformed America from a geographical expression into a new nation.” Merrell wanted to give the idea that the world was new to everyone, and just because you didn’t have to travel to a new area, doesn’t always mean you’re truly a native. The interactions and exchanges between those who were there first and those who come second can bring about major change.

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