In an official statement published on tuesday june 2

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In an official statement published on Tuesday June 2, the Polisario slammed Spain’s lack of support for their independence claims, calling on the European country, and former colonial power, to to recognize “the historical, political, legal and moral responsibility of the Spanish State” to stand with the self-proclaimed SADR against Morocco in the search for an equitable resolution to the Western Sahara conflict . Though seemingly an innocuous and apolitical decision, the move from the former colonial power to deny nationality of origin to Sahrawis could be seen as another implicit shift in support of Morocco’s territorial integrity, since the Supreme Court legislation notes that the Sahrawis are not “born stateless.” Combined with the clarification in the previous ruling that displaying symbols of entities “not compatible” with Spain’s constitutional framework, the Polisario could well take the most recent ruling as another blow to their cause.
In Algeria, the More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same Algerian president Abdelmajid Tebboune released the first draft of a new finance law in May 2020. The new law voids the 51/49 majority ownership law: Will this signal any tangible change? Rabat – In Algeria, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Since February 2019, the country has buzzed with words like “overhaul,” “new,” and “reform” but, despite the resignation of former president Abdelaziz Bouteflika, despite a new draft constitution, and despite changes to both domestic and foreign policy, the Hirak (protest movement) is far from over. The latest big change billed for Algeria is the reform of a finance law that, on the surface, will revolutionize the North African country’s economy. President Abdelmajid Tebboune’s government submitted a report to parliament on May 26. Under the draft legislation, Algeria’s iconic 51/49 finance rule will be declared void. The law previously stipulated that foreign investors could not own more than 49% of any given company and would, therefore, be obliged to enter into a majority partnership with an Algerian national. The majority ownership rule, enshrined in law in 2009, reflected Algeria’s image as a closed country and was seemingly designed to protect the financial interests of the Algerian population, as well as maintaining Algerian control over Algerian resources. In practice, however, the law had quite a different effect on the Algerian economy. While it did mean that foreign fingers were not able to delve into Algeria’s pie , it also stunted economic growth and, in part, led to the now struggling oil-dependent economy. Considering Algeria’s current financial woes , the repeal of the majority ownership law seems, from a distance, like a step in the right direction in that the draft
legislation could facilitate foreign investment, while maintaining Algerian control over certain “strategic sectors.” “It’s certain that Algeria is opening up to foreign investors and it’s a very encouraging sign for the Algerian economy, especially as the list of strategic

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