Which of these fish requires more of the suns energy

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Which of these fish requires more of the sun’s energy to grow? A. Tilapia (eats algae) B. Tuna (top predator) Tilapia (eats algae) Tune (top predator) 50% 50%
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Biomagnification Biomagnification Increase in concentration of certain molecules (esp. persistent organic pollutants) up the food chain
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Primary producers Primary consumers and decomposers Secondary consumers Tertiary consumers PCB concentration (ng/g lipid) Biomagnification How to eat a fish and avoid contaminants in fatty tissue: ebg&index=1&list=PLlgoHh4Po1J1aVVwT- EnWlFrttMKSRZyk 700 70 10 2
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Global Patterns in Productivity In general, NPP on land is much higher than it is in the oceans, because more light is available to drive photosynthesis on land than in marine environments The terrestrial ecosystems with highest productivity are located in the wet tropics The global productivity of terrestrial ecosystems is limited by a combination of temperature and availability of water and sunlight. At a local level, NPP on land is also limited by nutrient availability Marine productivity is highest along coastlines, and it can be as high near the poles as it is in tropics
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Which biome or area do you think has the highest NPP per unit area? A. Tropical Rainforest B. Desert C. Coral Reef D. Temperate forest E. Grassland Tropical Rainforest Desert Coral Reef Temperate forest Grassland 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
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Which biome or area do you think contributes the most to Earth’s NPP? A. Tropical Rainforest B. Desert C. Coral Reef D. Temperate forest E. Grassland Tropical Rainforest Desert Coral Reef Temperate forest Grassland 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
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Figure 56.9 Net primary productivity (kgC/m 2 /year)
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Figure 56.10 (a) NPP per unit area (b) Area covered, by ecosystem type Average net primary production (g/m 2 /yr) Percentage of Earth’s surface area Percentage of Earth’s net primary production (c) Total NPP Aquatic Terrestrial Coral reefs and algal beds Tropical wet forest Wetlands Tropical seasonal forest Temperate evergreen forest Estuary Temperate deciduous forest Savanna Boreal forest Woodland and shrubland Cultivated land Temperate grassland Upwelling zones Ocean neritic zone Lake and stream Tundra Open ocean Desert and semidesert scrub Rock, sand, ice
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Christopher Reinemann
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