Research report - National Child Labour Action Programme for South Africa (1).doc

Sufficient levels of grid electricity are not

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Sufficient levels of grid electricity are not available in many areas. The October Household Survey of 1999 found that electricity was the main source of energy for cooking for only just over one-fifth of households in non-urban areas, compared to close on three-quarters of all urban households. Nearly half of all households in rural areas and five sixths in urban areas use electricity for lighting only: much of electricity provision in the last few years is 8 Amp power, which is insufficient for cooking or heating, (Collecting fuel & water - Dept of Constitutional Development: 1998; Hassen: 2000, 9). 5.5.1 Introduction to the provision of basic municipal infrastructure and services Local government must ensure the provision of services to communities in a sustainable manner (S157, Constitution), and is therefore in the frontline of efforts to provide basic household infrastructure and services. Since the mid-1990s, government has introduced several capital investment programmes as conditional grants to extend access to basic services and infrastructure. Together, these programmes have made significant changes in the lives of some previously marginalised people. Presently, government only provides funding for infrastructure development if the projects are within the municipality’s Integrated Development Plans (IDPs). The IDP process is intended to ensure that development is planned in an integrated and coordinated fashion, with locally identified priorities. However, many municipalities, particularly those in rural areas, struggle to draw up these IDP plans and link them to budgets as required. And these are precisely the areas where children are most likely to be collecting fuel and water. However these problems are being addressed by the Department of Provincial and Local Government (DPLG) and other departments, aimed at capacitating local government. DWAF is providing specific support to planning processes in rural municipalities. The DPLG is rationalising most government infrastructure grants through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG), which was approved by Cabinet in March 2003. The MIG will be phased in over a three- year period, starting in 2003/04. Rationalised grants include those for water services, community based public works, sports and recreation facilities and urban transport facilities. Electrification funding (managed through the Department of Minerals and Energy) will be incorporated once the framework for restructuring the electricity distribution industry is finalised. Individual national line function or so called sector departments will continue to lead the policy, target setting, monitoring and support of implementation in their specific functions and priorities. The MIG has an overall target of removing the backlog with regard to access to basic municipal
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Page 48 Proposed action – by forms of harm Draft 4,10 Oct 2003 services by 2013, over a 10-year period. Sector departments are responsible for setting national goals e.g. the target for removing the backlog in access to basic water supply is 2008.
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