PHRM 514 STD's Fall 2012 (1)

Rectal and oropharyngeal swabs ? naat’s are the

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Unformatted text preview: Rectal and oropharyngeal swabs § NAAT’s are the most sensitive – can use with urine – self-collected specimens Knodel, LC. Sexually transmitted diseases. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines. MMWR 2010;59(RR-12):1-116. Chlamydial Infection During Pregnancy n May be transferred to an infant who comes in contact with cervicovaginal secretions § 2/3 acquire infection after contact n May manifest in eyes, nasopharynx, rectum or vagina § Conjunctivitis—develops in ~50% § Chlamydial pneumonitis—develops in ~16% Knodel, LC. Sexually transmitted diseases. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028. Syphilis Syphilis 2010 Statistics n 45,832 reported cases of any type of syphilis n 13,774 reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis § 4.5 cases/100,000 people n 377 cases of congenital syphilis reported Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2010. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2011. Syphilis n Caused by a spirochete bacteria § Trepenoma pallidum Knodel, LC. Sexually transmitted diseases. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028. Syphilis: Pathophysiology 1. Typically spread by sexual contact with infected mucus membranes or skin lesions § Rarely, may be transferred during close personal contact, accidental inoculation, or blood transfusion 2. T. pallidum penetrates intact mucus membrane or break in epithelium 3. Spirochetes enter blood Knodel, LC. Sexually transmitted diseases. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028. Primary Syphilis n Chancre develops at site of exposure n Common locations § External genitalia, perianal region, mouth, throat n Usually painless n Lymphadenopathy may also occur n Highly contagious at this stage n Chancre usually heals within 1 to 8 weeks (with or without treatment) Knodel, LC. Sexually transmitted diseases. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, et al., editors. Pharmacotherapy a pathophysiologic approach. 8th ed. New York: McGraw Hill Medical; 2011:2011-2028. Chancre Primary syphilis. Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/medical/IM00912. Accessed October 23, 2011. Secondary Syphilis...
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Rectal and oropharyngeal swabs  NAAT’s are the most...

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