From forecasting for daily items that are turned in a

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From forecasting for daily items that are turned in a grocery store (eggs, milk, juice) to items that are shipped once a year based on forecasts (firework stands) it becomes a very complicated algorithm to perfect. Bryan Sones
2/21/2016 Collection – MBA675­T303 Operations & Logistics in the (... ; 15/26 Thread: Chris Holder #6 Post: Chris Holder #6 Author: Posted Date: January 30, 2016 4:07 PM Status: Published (Post is Read) Lean manufacturing and JIT are often thought of as the same thing. Both strive for efficiency and removing waste but the difference is that lean manufacturing’s end desire is to add more value for the customer. Just in time philosophy is the belief that waste can be eliminated by cutting unnecessary capacity or inventory and removing non­value­added activities in operations (Krawjewski, Malhortra, & Ritzman, 2015, p. 208). Lean systems are operations systems that maximize the value added by each of a company’s activates by removing waste and delays from them (Krawjewski, Malhortra, & Ritzman, 2015, p. 209). A lean system can is a JIT system but a JIT system is not always a lean system. A JIT system highlights process gaps and can be practiced on its own or within a lean system. Krawjewski, L. j., Malhortra, M. K., & Ritzman, L. P. (2015). Operations Management: Processes and Supply Chains. Boston, MA: Pearson. Christopher Holder Thread: Chris Holder #6 Post: RE: Chris Holder #6 Author: Posted Date: January 31, 2016 9:00 AM Status: Published Chris, Thank you for the concise explanation of the difference between lean and just in time. I also appreciate how you include the customer piece is part of a lean system, while just in time is more internal facing. I think many times departments outside of the supply chain assume that a system is lean and running in an ideal state at all times. This can create tension between the various internal departments and external customers if a company is not running lean. Krajewski, Malhotra, and Ritzman (2015, p. 209) give examples of various departments being able to assist in creating the best environment for a lean system to flourish, such as human resources implementing proper incentive programs. All of these departments must work together to create the best customer experience in order to build loyalty and compete effectively. Reference: Jana McLendon
2/21/2016 Collection – MBA675­T303 Operations & Logistics in the (... ; 16/26 (Post is Read) Krajewski, L. J., Malhotra, M. K., & Ritzman, L. P. (2015). Operations Management: Processes and Supply Chains (11 ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson. Thread: Chris Holder #6 Post: RE: Chris Holder #6 Author: Posted Date: January 31, 2016 6:34 PM Status: Published (Post is Read) Hi Chris I looked into the differences between lean and JIT as well, and I came up with the same basic premise as you. What I really wanted to look at, though, was the difference between the Toyota system and these two systems. Yes, JIT systems

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