Churches and such worshippers and who has no sympathy

This preview shows page 91 - 94 out of 207 pages.

churches and such worshippers, and who has no sympathy with the natural physical wants of mankind. But in warmth and kindness and good cheer the child finds, amongst the world’s ‘publicans and sinners,’ all that he knows for good. (180)Undoubtedly, the child’s vision to eliminate harshness in the Church wouldentail dramatic change, perhaps the kind of change that only the gentle spirit of the child could envision. The truth of the change would mean breaking down oppressive conformity and replacing it with compassion, caring, and physical and spiritual well-being. Readers cometo understand the outcome of the child’s vision:God like a father rejoicing to see,Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
82His children as pleasant and happy as he:Would have no quarrel with the Devil or the Barrel But kiss him & give him both drink and apparel. (13-16)The cold of the Urizenic church would disappear beside the warm, happy fire of the vagabond’s Devil, or in other words, the happy reality of a warmer, more comfortable life. And, God becomes a loving father instead of the oppressive Urizenic father. The Devil, or the collective vagabond spirit, would be nurtured and given the loving “kiss” of a newly established moral humanity in “the break of day” the Bard envisions in the “Introduction” (20).The top half of the illustration for “The Little Vagabond” emphasizes the speaker’s hopeful vision. God appears as a loving father figure who kneels down in a cove of trees and places his arms around a vagabond kneeling in front of him. In addition, bright light emanates from God’s head, and the light’s white and red appearance glow like warm fire, perhaps like the fire the vagabond in the poem imagines in the church. Certainly, thisfather would allow the fire. In addition, the letter “V” in the word vagabond opens below the center of the God-vagabond embrace, directing us to its character of loving acceptance. The scene at the bottom is a contrast in its significance, and it is fitting that the different scenes are stationed at opposite ends of the plate (and at opposite ends of the text). A careworn father sits on a small mound (likely a rock) while his son is being ignored as he stands by a fire. Meanwhile, as Erdman accurately explains, “The mother on the other side of the fire crouches and hides her face (thoughReproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
83Blake can give her a face looking up ...) with one child kneeling before her, reaching its arms around her knee and neck, another ignored at her left knee. Only the two ignored children see or accept the light of the fire” (87). While the vagabond on the top half of the plate is warmed by God’s truly fatherly love, the ignored children in the plate below must approach the fire on their own; their poor parents cannot give the same comfort as God above. One must then consider that Urizenic forces have caused the adults’ love to

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture