It remains always necessary to consider whether or not these given institutions

It remains always necessary to consider whether or

This preview shows page 114 - 115 out of 149 pages.

It remains always necessary to consider whether or not these given institutions truly serve to satisfy the demands of the community, the people, and social movements. If they do not serve these demands, they need to be transformed . Chavez changed the Constitution at the outset of his¶ delegated exercise of power, as did Evo Morales. That is, the package of State institutions (potestas) need s to be untied and changed as a whole by conserving what is sustainable and eliminating what is unjust -thereby creating the new. Power ( as potestas ) is not "taken" en bloc · It is reconstituted and exercised critically in view of the material satisfaction of needs, in fulfillment of the normative demands of democratic legitimacy, and within empirical political possibility . But, to be clear, without the obediential exercise of delegated institutional power the world cannot feasibly be changed . To attempt to do so is little more than abstract and apolitical 'moralism and idealism, which clearly results from¶ practical and theoretical confusions . However, these quasi-anarchists do in-¶ deed remind us that institutions become fetishized and always need to be¶ transformed, as Marx points out.¶ [20.1.3] On the level of strategic feasibility, in order to change the world one¶ needs to rely on an extraordinarily healthy political postulate: that of the¶ 'dissolution of the State." This postulate can be put approximately as follows:¶ We must operate in such a way as to tend toward the (empirically impossible) identity of representation with the represented, in such a way that State institutions become always increasingly transparent, effective, simplified, etc. Such a condition would not, however, be a "minimal State"-in either the Right-wing version of Nozick or the left-wing version of Bakunin- but rather a "subjectified State," in which the institutions become diminished due to the increasingly shared responsibility by all citizens ("We are all the State!").132 This¶ would need to proceed alongside the application of the electronic revolution in¶ order to reduce almost to zero the time and space required for citizen par,¶ ticipation, 133 in terms of collecting the opinion of the citizenry to constitute a¶ consensus or carry out bureaucratic procedures. This would be a virtual State¶ with decentralized offices, managed by Web sites, and the State of the future¶ would be so different from that of the present that many of its most bureau,¶ cratic, opaque, and bloated institutions would have disappeared . . . It would¶ appear that the State no longer exists, but it will be more present than ever as¶ the normative responsibility of each citizen toward the others . This is the¶ criterion of orientation that follows from the postulate of the 'dissolution of¶ the State."¶ Studies prove that engagement with the government is critical to reform success Rootes , Centre for the Study of Social and Political Movements – School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research @ University of Kent, 13
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