Compromise position accommodation a compromise

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Compromise (Position Accommodation) A compromise solution that would not further the interests of either Samantha or Emma would be to stay in their current location and to maintain the status quo. Compromises are not considered to be a good integration strategy except for circumstances where parties are very entrenched and it is unlikely that a more comprehensive agreement is possible. Logroll (Position Accommodation) Successful logrolling requires the parties to find more than one issue in conflict and to have different priorities for those issues (Tajima and Fraser, 2001). The parties then agree to trade off among these issues so that one party achieves a highly preferred outcome on the first issue and the other person achieves a highly preferred outcome on the second issue. If the parties do in fact have different preferences on different Key Steps in the Integrative Negotiation Process 85
issues and each party gets his or her most preferred outcome on a high-priority issue, then each should receive more and the joint outcomes should be higher (Moran and Ritov, 2002). For instance, the Advanced Management Consulting could lease the downtown location and give Emma the bigger office. Samantha would get her preferred location, which is more im- portant to her, and Emma would receive better working space, which is more important to her. Logrolling is frequently done by trial and error—as part of the process of experiment- ing with various packages of offers that will satisfy everyone involved. The parties must first establish which issues are at stake and then decide their individual priorities on these issues. If there are already at least two issues on the table, then any combination of two or more issues may be suitable for logrolling. Research suggests that negotiators reach better agreements as the number of issues being negotiated increases (Naquin, 2002). Negotiator satisfaction may be less when more issues are negotiated, however, because negotiators be- lieve that they could have done better on one or more issues. (Negotiator cognition and sat- isfaction is discussed in more detail in Chapter 5.) If it appears initially that only one issue is at stake, the parties may need to engage in “unbundling” or “unlinking,” which is the process of separating a single issue into two or more issues so that the logrolling may be- gin (Lax and Sebenius, 1986; Pruitt, 1981). Additional issues of concern may also be gen- erated through the brainstorming processes described later. Finally, research by Mannix, Tinsley and Bazerman (1995) suggests that logrolling is less likely in a series of negotiations when the negotiator believes that there is a higher probability that the negotiator representing the other firm will be changed in someone else.

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