Table 21 Strategic Use of Visuals lists some common types of visuals and gives

Table 21 strategic use of visuals lists some common

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Table 2.1 “Strategic Use of Visuals” lists some common types of visuals and gives examples of their strategic uses. Table 2.1 Strategic Use of Visuals 41
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Type Purpose Example(s) Photograph, Video Clip, or Video Still Show an actual person, event, or work of art. Figure 2.3 Historic photo of U.S. troops raising the flag on Iwo Jima. USMC Archives – Flag Raising on Iwo Jima – CC BY 2.0. 42 BUSINESS COMMUNICATION FOR SUCCESS
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Type Purpose Example(s) Video Trailer, Video Still Show the visual relationships among two or more things; a shape, a contrast in size, a process or how something works. Figure 2.4 Michael Coté – Process Improvement Model – CC BY 2.0. Bar Chart Show the amount of one or more variables at different time intervals. Figure 2.5 Jason Tester Guerrilla Future – CC BY-ND 2.0. 2.5 EMPHASIS STRATEGIES • 43
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Type Purpose Example(s) Pie Chart Show the percentages of the whole occupied by various segments. Figure 2.6 Chris Potter – 3D Budget Pie Chart – CC BY 2.0. Line Graph Show the change in one or more variables progressively across time. Figure 2.7 Michael Coté – GOOG at $381.55 – CC BY 2.0. 44 BUSINESS COMMUNICATION FOR SUCCESS
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Type Purpose Example(s) Actual Object Show the audience an item crucial to the discussion. Figure 2.8 jessica wilson – masky – CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. 2.5 EMPHASIS STRATEGIES • 45
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Type Purpose Example(s) Body Motion Use your body as a visual to demonstrate an event. Figure 2.9 Sit in a chair, pretend to buckle up, look at the audience, pretend to drive, and then have a mock accident, turning your chair on its side. Signposts Signposts (or indicators) , are key words that alert the audience to a change in topic, a tangential explanation, an example, or a conclusion. Readers and listeners can sometimes be lulled into “losing their place”—forgetting what point is being made or how far along in the discussion the writer or speaker has gotten. You can help your audience avoid this by signaling to them when a change is coming. Common signposts include “on the one hand,” “on the other hand,” “the solution to this problem is,” “the reason for this is,” “for example,” “to illustrate,” and “in conclusion” or “in summary.” Internal Summaries and Foreshadowing Like signposts, internal summaries and foreshadowing help the audience to keep track of where they are in the message. These strategies work by reviewing what has been covered and by highlighting what is coming next. As a simple example, suppose you are writing or presenting information on how to assemble a home emergency preparedness kit. If you begin by stating that there are four main items needed for the kit, you are foreshadowing your message and helping your audience to watch or listen for four items. As you cover each of the items, you can say, 46 BUSINESS COMMUNICATION FOR SUCCESS
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“The first item,” “The second item,” “Now we’ve got X and Y in our kit; what else do we need? Our third item is,” and so forth. These internal summaries help your audience keep track of progress as your message continues. (The four
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