The art is itself straightforward in terms of the way

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The art is itself straightforward in terms of the way it is painted but the ideas in the art are abstract themselves as they depict Jane’s memories which strengthen the idea of Jane having a vivid and accurate memory capacity and due to this, retains a lot of knowledge-In Moor House she is drawn to the Rivers’ house because she sees Diana and Mary speaking German which interests Jane so she asks them for shelter and homageAlmost immediately after Jane feels better she talks to Diana and Mary about their education and what they are learningJane decides to learn German from the two girls and later begins learning Hindustani because St. John acknowledges her love of learning and suggests she learn it as he is learning it himselfJane continues painting/drawing and shows Diana and Mary as Jane enjoys spending time with the girls mainly because they are fun since Jane is always learning new things about themJane also learns of Calvinism here and she directly refers to St. John’s prayer referencing “Calvinistic doctrines” which demonstrates her knowledge of the doctrine and also having the knowledge as to acknowledge that St. John is Calvinistic but she never directly confronts St. John about him being a Calvinistic which shows Jane’s maturity because she understands people have different views on religion and she doesn’t have a right to insult or confront their religious views despite Jane’s opposing views of it-Everywhere she goes, she is a student and it is evident that she will see herself as a student every single day of her life because she is constantly learning new things which is because of her determination to gain new knowledge-It is because of Jane’s education that she gets a good job as a teacher and a governess and builds a life around it, ultimately ending up as a rich, independent woman who has experienced love from family and others 12. Compare and contrast Mr. Rochester’s love for Jane and St. John’s love for Jane. - Both are controlling men and both want control over Jane - By the end of the novel Rochester is humbled and Jane and him are equal in status and as human beings so in Ferndean Rochester wants just to love Jane, not control her so much - St. John never changes his viewpoints because he is so strict in his religious doctrine and thus seeks martyrdom and a wife who wants the same, even though doesn’t want martyrdom - St. John is looking for a missionary wife to help him spread the doctrine of Calvinism and educate others so they may be salvaged by righteous God - St. John is not willing to give up his missionary duties for love and this also occurs with Miss Oliver as well - He explicitly states that if they marry, they can expand the “Maker’s spiritual kingdom” but never says anything directly about their relationship and bond as lovers - St. John also state that denying his marriage offer would be denying God to make Jane feel guilty and make her think twice

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