Mill surrendered to death in 1873 at avignon where he

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were published posthumously by Helen Taylor. Mill surrendered to death in 1873 at Avignon, where  he is buried next to his wife. 1.41  SUBTOPIC 2: J. S. Mill’s Purpose and Summary of  On Liberty   a)      Mills’ purpose   To discuss the degree to which the government and society may interfere in the lives of the citizens.  The argument is that as human beings we are endowed with the ability to think and determine the  destiny of our own lives:- that any interference by the government in the freedom and liberties of  individual persons is only necessary if it aims at preventing one person from harming the other but  such interference cannot be warranted where the government has as its aim the appropriation of the  freedom and liberties of individual persons and gag their creative potentials.   b)      Summary of  On Liberty In  On Liberty  Mill discusses the degree to which the government and society may interfere in the  lives of citizens. He argues that such interference is warranted only to prevent one person from  harming another. Compelling someone to act for his own good, or to prevent him from harming  himself, is never justified.  (Berger, 1984).  According to Mill people should be allowed to think and  speak, as they like, to choose their own way of living, and to choose their associates. And because  Mill’s principle draws the line at harm to others- a pure utilitarian principle (utilitarianism is the theory  that we should strive to produce as much happiness as possible), it is often called the “harm  principle.” According to J. S. Mill government is not a matter of natural rights or social contract, as in many  forms of liberalism. Forms of government are, rather, to be judged according to “utility in the largest  sense, grounded on the permanent interest of man as a progressive being” ( On Liberty , p. 224). By  this he means that forms of government are to be evaluated in terms of their capacity to enable each
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person to exercise and develop in his or her own way their capacities for higher forms of human  happiness. Such development will be an end for each individual, but also a means for society as  whole to develop and to make life better for all. Given the centrality of self-development, Mill argues that liberty is a fundamental human right. “The  sole end,” he proposes, “for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively… in interfering  with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection” ( On Liberty  p. 223). This will 
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