Esci 274 managing human environments the waste

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ESCI 274 Managing Human Environments The Waste Hierarchy is a list of approaches to managing waste, arranged in order of preferability. The Waste Hierarchy is widely used as a simple communication tool to remind those who generate or manage waste that strategies which try to avoid products becoming waste are generally preferable to strategies which seek to find a use for waste , which are in turn generally preferable to strategies for disposal which should be used as a last resort.
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ESCI 274
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ESCI 274 The idea of waste hierarchy  Managing Human Environments Recycling is not enough
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ESCI 274 The idea of waste hierarchy  Managing Human Environments Recycling is not enough    Does not consume       the same energy           as recycling              but …
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ESCI 274 The idea of waste hierarchy  Managing Human Environments Recycling is not enough
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ESCI 274 The idea of waste hierarchy  Managing Human Environments Recycling is not enough
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ESCI 274 The idea of waste hierarchy  Managing Human Environments Energy recovered from waste
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Waste management For management purposes, waste is  divided into four main categories: Municipal  solid waste Industrial  solid waste Wastewater Hazardous  waste
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Municipal  solid waste (MSW) Non-liquid waste that comes from  homes, institutions and small business (More commonly referred to as trash or garbage) They are in either solid or semisolid form 
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ESCI 274 There are five broad categories of MSW: 1. Biodegradable waste: food and kitchen waste, green waste, paper (can also be recycled). 2. Recyclable material: paper, glass, bottles, cans, metals, certain plastics, etc. 3. Inert waste: construction and demolition waste, dirt, rocks, debris. 4. Composite wastes; waste clothing, Tetra Paks, waste plastics such as toys. Domestic hazardous waste (also called "household hazardous waste") & toxic waste: medication, e- waste, paints, chemicals, light bulbs, fluorescent tubes, spray cans, fertilizer and pesticide containers, batteries, shoe polish.
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Municipal  solid waste
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Municipal  solid waste Municipal waste composition in industrialized countries
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Industrial  solid waste Non-liquid waste that comes from  the production of consumer goods,  mining, agriculture, and petroleum  extraction and refining
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Wastewater Liquid waste from household, business,  industries or public facilities, as well as  polluted runoff from streets and storm drains
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Hazardous  waste Solid or liquid waste that is  toxic,  chemically reactive, flammable, or corrosive It can include everything from paint and  household cleaners to medical waste  and industrial solvents
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