Actually be confirmed by walton as he sprung from the

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actually be confirmed by Walton , as he “sprung from the cabin window… [and] was soon… lost in darkness and distance” . Therefore, allowing for the possibility of the creature continuing his existence despite his misery, this prospect permitted only by Walton’s empathy and reluctance to destroy the creature himself. Furthermore, in allowing the creature to face his own end, Walton discontinues the ruinous cycle of revenge that “enslaved” and was sustained by Frankenstein and the creature; elucidating another contention of Shelley’s. Lastly, Walton’s decision to return to London despite the criticism he receives from “the brother of [his] heart” , ironically due to Frankenstein’s morose tale , is Shelley positioning the reader to concur with her criticism of blind ambition. This denouement is of contradiction to Walton’s prior epistles to his sister Margaret, as although he states he “shall kill no albatross”, this promise is only fulfilled in his inefficacious return. Moreover, Shelley is also advocating for her readers to heed to the warnings of others, even if that means dismissing the audacious ambitions that hold the prospect of glory. FRANKENSTEIN AND CREATURE PARALELLED The overt contrasts and contradictions between Frankenstein and the creature’s depiction of certain events, reveals how different perspectives can create different narratives. Frankenstein’s voice provides a wretched depiction of the monster, as he judges many of the creature’s actions to be of cruel intent , on the basis of his visage . Frankenstein also judges his creature’s soul to be inherently evil, since his appearance is described to be that of a “demoniacal corpse” . However, in the creature’s eloquent description of his experiences since birth, Shelley demonstrates how narrators can be unreliable. Frankenstein’s recount of the creature having “one hand as stretched out, seemingly to detain me” with a “grin [that] wrinkled his cheeks” , depicts a monster with ill-intent who, from the point of birth, aims to bring suffering to others. Conversely, the creature’s retail of his own birth depicts a tumultuous awakening whereby the only constant was confusion, leaving him “poor, helpless, miserable… [having the ] feeling [of] pain invade me on all sides.” This self -reflection suggests he aligns closer to that of an infant reaching out to its parent, rather than a “wretch” or “miserable monster”. Even prior to the contrasting of their perspectives, in considering the differences in Victor and the creature’s language and expression throughout
35 their conversing in the Alps, also elucidates the apocryphal bias within a narrator’s voice. Victor’s voice is of fragmented speech accompanied by rhetorical and emotive language in demeaning the creature, with phrases such as “Begone, vile insect”, “the tortures of hell are too mild for thy crimes” and “Abhorred monster! Fiend that though art!”. Such an aggressive and melodramatic tone offers irony; in that a man who has been depicted as a

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