very confounding as this theory is still purported as being scientific today

Very confounding as this theory is still purported as

This preview shows page 27 - 29 out of 36 pages.

very confounding, as this theory is still purported as being “scientific” today, and continues to be upheld by scientists and historians, and well as popular culture. Besides how it originated, controversies surrounding the theory include that there is a lack of scientific evidence to substantiate it, and that its validity has been continually professed in spite of evidence contradicting it (for example, linguistic evidence; the variety in indigenous North American languages point to human presence being there for a much longer time than what the BST states was the time period for ancient humans crossing the land bridge). Furthermore, evidence countering the theory has been repeatedly discredited and ridiculed by academic and scientific “experts” throughout its history. The Bering Straight Theory proposes that the first people to populate the Americas were believed to have migrated from modern-day Siberia to modern-day Alaska while tracking large animal herds after the Ice Age via the Bering Strait ice bridge.The
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*1-2 sentences for the short answer. 1-2 paragraphs for the long answers. significance of beginning the class with the Bering Strait Theory was to challenge our preconceptions about history by seeing there is never a single story in history; there are often multiple perspectives and questions of power to be considered. Controversies surrounding the theory include that there is a lack of scientific evidence to substantiate it, and that its validity has been continually professed in spite of evidence contradicting it for example, linguistic evidence; the variety in indigenous North American languages point to human presence being there for a much longer time than what the BST states was the time period for ancient humans crossing the land bridge. The BST articles were written by Alexander Ewan (who appears to be a historian/anthropologist, based on the titles of his other articles that are on Indian Country Media Network), in 2014. They are published on the the Indian Country Media Network website. The articles are primarily intended for an audience connected to Native Americans, either by heritage and/or personal study/interest. All of these factors impart the perspective of the articles--it is not a mainstream American one, or one likely to be heard in popular media. This connects with Adichie’s TEDTalk from last week--the articles do not agree with the “single story” that most people learn about the Bering Strait Theory and the history of ancient humans in America; they highlight the controversies of the long-held theory that are often never heard about, and how its dissenters have been frequently and strongly shut-down. An example of “firsting” that comes to mind is one that I learned last semester in Anthropology 402. Western medicine is popularly believed to be the sole originator of effective inoculations. This is not the case, as traditional inoculations (such as grinding up pox
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