Design standards for parking structures apply to

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Design standards for parking structures apply to parking located on the ground floor of a building as well. Maximum building height restrictions apply to parking structures. Facades of parking structures shall comply with design standards for massing, articulation, and materials established for other building types. Design openings in parking structures to be compatible with neighboring buildings. Screen openings in parking structures so that no cars, headlights, or light fixtures are visible from the surrounding streets and uses. Locate pedestrian entrances to parking structures adjacent to vehicle entrances. Ceiling heights for retail commercial uses on the ground floors of parking structures shall be minimum 12 feet. Parking levels are included when measuring building height. See the Tallahassee Land Development Regulations for the complete standards. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.
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Recycled concrete Recycled asphalt Consider pervious and semi-pervious paving materials, and unit pavers made of recycled materials. Brick in simple patterns Recycled glass Recycled concrete Pervious concrete Pervious pavers D E S I G N R E V I E W D I S T R I C T S A L L D I S T R I C T S BU I L D I N G D E S I G N T a l l a h a s s e e - L e o n C o u n t y P l a n n i n g D e p a r t m e n t 3.b. G A I N E S S T R E E T ¶¸ 3.b.11. Materials and Construction T he quality of a building’s design and the choice and durability of its materials contribute significantly to a sense of place, and enrich the public realm. New buildings of high design quality and construction indicate that people are “putting down roots” in the community. New construction can reflect contemporary design standards while using elements, devices, and patterns drawn from the older urban fabric around it. Good contemporary architecture is welcome in every district. Well-built buildings last, and embody the history of the city as they age. Like the old buildings in downtown Tallahassee, Gaines Street’s buildings should be designed for a life span of seventy-five years or more. Every new building should be a long-term component of the urban fabric. Quality building stock is a good use of natural resources. Designing and building for many years of use means less energy spent making new building materials, and less demolition waste. PRINCIPLES Evoke a Sense of Place Enrich the Public Realm Build to Human Scale Fit the Neighborhood Add Rhythm and Pattern Entertain the Eye GUIDELINES BUILDING MATERIALS Use high quality, low maintenance building materials. Exterior materials should reflect a sense of permanence, continuity, and urban character. New building materials should complement the materials and techniques of the Gaines Street architectural contexts.
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