The south remained rural and agriculture driven jim

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The south remained rural and agriculture driven Jim Crow Laws Prevent African Americans from voting Denied African Americans equal access to things like housing and education These laws originated from Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson - Homer Plessy sits knowingly in a white only train car and is arrested. He sues that his arrest went against the 14 th amendment of equal access. - The supreme ruled against Plessy and stated that as long as the facilities were of equal standard then there could be a racial segregation and separate facilities for races.
- Guaranteed the failure of Reconstruction Lynching Extrajudicial punishment for a crime Often carried out by a mob or a small crowd Mostly targeted African Americans From 1890-1899 - Average of 188 lynchings per year - 82 percent occurred in the south - Whites comprised 32 percent of lynching victims From 1900-1909 - Average of 93 lynchings per year - 92 percent occurred in the south - Whites comprised 11 percent of lynching victims How did lynching change at the end of the 19 th century? More racialized, directed toward African Americans Protecting southern white womanhood against the “black male predator” became the cornerstone of lynching Lynching became public spectacles The most photographed lynching in history was in Waco in 1916 of Jesse Washington for the death of a white women – (he did not commit the crime) Elisabeth Freeman was one of the earliest advocates for the anti-lynching legislature movement

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