They receive complaints investigate the validity of

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They receive complaints, investigate the validity of those claims, and reach resolutions If a resolution cannot be reached, they will choose to bring a civil suit If they decide against a civil suit, the charging party may be given the right to file civil suit on their own behalf
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Outcomes Several “remedies” are available for discrimination back pay hiring promotion reinstatement front pay (i.e. future wages) reasonable accommodation other actions that will make an individual "whole“ Compensatory and punitive damages also may be available for intentional discrimination is found
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Exposure to Toxic Chemicals Because ill-effects were not immediately apparent, most safety reform prior to the 1970s focused on preventing traumatic injury The first national effort to protect workers from disease occurred in 1969 with the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act In 1970 OSHA became responsible for protecting workers from these things
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Cancer and Chemical Exposure Researchers estimate that between 4 – 20% of all cancer related deaths are due to occupational factors Lung cancer studies caused by the workplace find that 31% of employees are exposed to specific carcinogens including Arsenic, asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, diesel fumes, environmental tobacco smoke, nickel, radon, or silica.
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Colorful Lungs Beside fumes, particulate matter can also cause lung disease Black lung: Build-up of coal dust common in coal miners Brown lung: Build-up of cotton dust common in yarn, tread, or fabric manufacturing industries White lung: (aka asbestosis) build-up of asbestos fibers common in people who work with or near asbestos
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Asbestos Fibrous silicate minerals found in mined rock Used to be very popular in many commercial and industrial products during the early 20 th century Preferred for its strength and fire retardant properties Commonly used in insulation, pipe, roofing shingles, wall plaster, and cement
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Unrefined Asbestos
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Asbestos Dangers Fell out of favor for being a health hazard The first report of the hazard was published in the British Medical Journal in 1924 The small fibers become stuck in the lungs and lead to asbestosis and mesothelioma May take up to 10 – 40 years for these diseases to appear Congressional hearings during the late ‘70s report ~20 – 25% of factory workers and persons installing asbestos products die of lung cancer
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Asbestos Related Deaths Estimated 11 million workers in the United States have been exposed to asbestos dust at work Approximately ten thousand Americans die each year from asbestos
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Johns-Manville Corporation The largest producer of asbestos products in their day Began manufacturing products in 1901 By 1925 they reported annual sales of $40 million In 1982 they claimed to be the largest asbestos processor in the world
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The Cover-Up Internal documents reported the dangers of the mineral as early as 1930
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  • Spring '14
  • AidaY.Hass
  • The Jungle, Occupational safety and health, Sherman Antitrust Act, Food and Drug Administration, Corporate crime

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