We face technological limitations with computer chess

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We face technological limitations with computer chess because computers aren’t as fast as we want them to be. If computers get faster (which they undoubtedly will), computer chess might be revolutionized. If there was a computer that can process information fast enough, it will be able to use the brute force approach when playing chess because an advanced computer such as this will be able to calculate the numerous board positions (Yovits, 60). Computers themselves are an emerging technology and they have advanced faster than anyone could have anticipated. So when computers get even faster, computers might never lose at chess if they were to play a human. People can use computers to help them get better at chess. For beginners who don’t know how to play and don’t own a chessboard, they could learn from the internet and play against the computer. This is a better option than paying money and buying chessboards and reading directions because computer chess is free and you can watch the moves a piece makes. Also, you don’t need someone to play chess with because you can just play against the computer. Computer chess is arguably helpful for experts who want to get better. They have the ability to play computer chess on hard and practice nonstop. While computer chess does have its benefits, there are also some drawbacks. In a sense, computer chess destroys how the game of chess was intended to be played. Chess was meant to be played human vs. human and not human vs. computer. Another drawback is playing a computer is different from playing a human. Computers are not prone to errors that a human makes and you cannot read a computer to figure out their strategy. Playing a computer does not help you respond to a human play. Grandmaster
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Judit Polgar said “Chess is thirty to forty percent psychology. You don’t have this when you play a computer” (Stewart). She believes that playing a computer is completely different than playing a human being. Also, people can get addicted to online chess. Chess is meant to be played against a human opponent but since you can play online chess anytime you want, it is easy to get addicted. It is also very easy to cheat with computer chess. There are grandmasters who do not like cpmouter chess because they feel it takes away the beauty of the game. For example, chess play Levon Aronian said “Chess programs are our enemies, they destroy the romance of chess. They take away the beauty of the game. Everything can be calculated” (Stewart). Players sometimes use computer chess to make their move in multiplayer chess which makes it impossible to hold online tournaments. If technology keeps increasing at this rate, computers might become the best at chess and even grandmasters won’t be able to win anymore.
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