Stress disrupts our ability to communicate effectively More likely to snap Less

Stress disrupts our ability to communicate

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Stress disrupts our ability to communicate effectively More likely to snap Less likely to give support Social Support Social support: Existence of social relationships Structure of one’s network Enacted social support The paradox of social support Perceived support: The idea that support is available Generally associated with very positive outcomes Enacted or received support: An instance of support Generally associated with negative outcomes, especially negative mood Possible explanation: When we receive enacted support, there is already a stressor present However, experiments have eliminated this as a possibility The most common support type: Advice The support we want the least: Advice Experiment: Undergraduate paired with a confederate Told they will have to conduct a public speaking activity that will later be evaluated - this induces stress/anxiety Participant gives practice talk to the confederate Confederate remains neutral during the talk
Before the talk, the confederate is given 1 of 3 support conditions Support directly Showed the highest level of anxiety However, the participants were more likely to indicate that they received support and that they liked the confederate more Support indirectly (Tell someone else how they did) Showed the lowest level of anxiety in participants Why? Seems more honest and sincere Seems like more of a confirmation than a criticism Say nothing When the type of support we are seeking is the type of support we receive, it’s effective Easier said than done Video in class: “It’s not about the nail.” The Power of Giving Giving support lights up reward regions in the brain Giving support reduces mortality risk Giving support wipes away any negative effect of receiving support Could be that receiving support makes us feel weak/incompetent/etc, while giving support makes us feel strong/adequate/helpful/needed Gleason’s study Daily support incentives Importance of reciprocity Thus, the power of relationships is thus: Not the power of love, but the power of feeling needed Conflict Conflict is unavoidable Conflict can be detrimental Gottman’s studies Videotaped couples having a fight and coded for specific behaviors afterwards Caveat: Would not be the same as an argument at home; however, we would expect behaviors to only be more prevalent at home Identified 7 signs of distressed couples that were highly likely to divorce (Should be noted that his ability to predict divorce is overstated, as his assumptions were made after the fact) Signs Harsh start up No problem getting the argument started Flooding Partner’s negativity is so overwhelming and sudden that the other partner feels shell-shocked Body Language Heart rate, hormones, etc
The use and receipt of problem skills are associated with

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