Sandwich Stall V and G created a sandwich stall that offered a comprehensive

Sandwich stall v and g created a sandwich stall that

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Sandwich StallV and G created a sandwich stall that offered a comprehensive menu listing the food items andtheir prices (Figure 13).18/31
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Figure 13. Creating the sandwich shop menu entailed using text, symbols, and numerals.The two children used a variety of patterns, texture, colors, and shapes to make ingredients forthe “food” available at the sandwich stall (Figure 14). For example, V drew brown lines on acircular piece of sponge, reflecting her knowledge of the appearance of a meat patty (Figure15).19/31
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Figure 14. The children made representations of a variety of sandwich ingredients.20/31
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Figure 15. A circular piece of sponge was the basis for this representation of a meat patty.We noted that as the children worked on the food stalls in pairs, they had a number ofopportunities to take initiative and exercise creativity, to use mathematical thinking, and to gainconfidence about working out solutions for themselves (MacNaughton & Williams, 2008). Theyapplied skills related to writing, communication, negotiation, and categorization in a variety ofways. They worked cooperatively to plan tasks, organize materials, and make the items theyneeded, generating ideas and strategies for solving problems that arose as they made thestalls.Pretend Play: Buying and SellingAfter completing the food stalls, the children engaged in pretend play related to buying andselling their food over the following 2 weeks. The following vignette illustrates how F and Bnegotiated the roles of cook, server, and cashier, and how they used logical-mathematical21/31
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knowledge during their cash transactions:B:Someone has to cook.F:I serve customer, you cook.B:Who is going to be the cashier?B:I’ll be the cashier.X:I want to buy chicken rice.F:You want this chicken rice set or chicken rice with jelly set?X:How much (is) the chicken rice set?F:One dollar. The one with jelly is 50 cents more.B extended a “chicken rice set” to X. F took it with his right hand and pulled it away from Xbefore he could take it.F(stretches out his left hand with open palm): You get your food after you pay. Give me yourmoney.F also showed awareness of typical sales procedures—the customer pays first, then receivesfood.The teachers also observed V using complex communication skills to persuade a potential“customer” to purchase her fruit:S:How much?V:Sorry you cannot buy this. It’s not for sale.S:Why?V: I use this box for putting my money—it’s my money box.S:Oh.V:You want oranges? Veeery juicy. Only 5 cents for one.S:...V:Maybe some apples? Nice and crunchy—also one for 5 cents.S:Ok. I want two.V:Ok. Two for 10 cents please. If you buy more, I give you a discount.V and F were among several children who, during our observations, demonstrated awarenessof the conventions and rules of buying and selling, including (in V’s case) knowledge of the22/31
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practice of giving discounts for purchasing larger quantities.
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  • Fall '14
  • Primary school

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