Edema of the pharynx and larynx and severe wheezing

This preview shows page 17 - 18 out of 18 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Nutrition for Health and Health Care
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 20 / Exercise 7
Nutrition for Health and Health Care
DeBruyne/Pinna
Expert Verified
edema of the pharynx and larynx, and severe wheezing and shortness of breath 3. Immediate medical attention is required to treat anaphylactic reactions. 4. A patient with a known history of an allergy to a medication needs to avoid taking that medication in the future and wear an identification bracelet or medal, which alerts nurses and other health care providers to the allergy if a patient is unable to communicate when receiving medical care. v. Mild Allergic Reactions: 1. Urticaria (hives): raised, irregularly shaped skin eruptions with varying sizes and shapes; eruptions have reddened margins and pale centers 2. Rash: small, raised vesicles that are ususally reddened, often distributed over entire body 3. Pruritus: itching of skin; accompanies most rashes 4. Rhinitis: inflammation of mucous membranes lining nose; causes swelling and clear, watery discharge. 68. Medication interaction: when one medication modifies the action of another, a medication interaction occurs. Medication interactions are common when people take several medications. a. Some medications increase or diminish the action of others or alter the way another medication is absorbed. b. When two medications have a synergistic effect, their combined effect is greater than the effect of the medications when given separately. For example, alcohol is a central nervous system depressant that has a synergistic effect on antihistamines, antidepressants, barbiturates, and narcotic analgesics. c. Sometimes a medication interaction is desired. Health care providers often combine medications to create an interaction that has a beneficial effect. For example, a patient with high blood pressure takes several medications such as diuretics and vasodilators that act together to control blood pressure when one medication is not effective on its own. 69. Page 17 of 18
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Nutrition for Health and Health Care
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 20 / Exercise 7
Nutrition for Health and Health Care
DeBruyne/Pinna
Expert Verified
FINAL EXAM- NR224 Dosage Schedule (Meaning) Abbreviation Before meals AC, ac As desired Ad lib Twice a day BID, bid After meals PC, pc Whenever there is a need Prn Every morning, every AM -qam Every hour -qh Every day Daily Every 4 hours Q4h 4 times a day QID, qid Give immediately STAT, stat 3 times per day TID, tid In the evening or at bedtime hs Right ear, left ear, each ear AD, AS, AU Right eye, left eye, each eye OD, OS. OU Bedtime BT Half-strenght HS Once Daily o.d. or OD When you teach patients about medication schedules, use familiar language. For example, instruct a patient who needs to take a medication twice a day to take it in the morning and again in the evening. Use knowledge about time intervals and terms used to describe medication actions to anticipate the effect of a medication and educate the patient about when to expect a response TERM MEANING Onset Time it takes after a medication is administered for it to produce a response Peak Time it takes for a medication to reach its highest effective concentration Trough Minimum blood serum concentration of medication reached just before the next scheduled dose Duration Tiem during wich medication is present in

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture